Why Contador is declared winner after stage 20

novetan

Senior Member
This rules are not written or could be found. Hence I'm asking here.

Contador seems like he has won the Giro after stage 20 with 2 mins to spare. Granted the last stage is relatively flat, to take 2 mins off from him is unrealistic. What if:

1) last stage is a tough climb.
2) If Contador has only 5 sec. advantage. Isn't the last stage will be crucial?

Will the winner still be declared after stage 20? Is stage 21 always just a ceremonial ride? Or is it down right to the commisaire to conclude what is deem appropriate?

Apology if my question sound stupid.
 

martint235

Dog on a bike
Location
Welling
He hasn't been declared the winner. He's the winner if nothing untoward happens. The last stage is, for GC riders, largely ceremonial but there is still a sprint at the end. Should Contador hit a bit of oil on the road, fall off and be unable to continue he won't win the Giro. If you have any doubts about this, look at the collective relief on the faces of the Tinkoff team once Contador passes the 3km to go mark (although if I remember correctly although he will get the same time if a crash happens in the final 3km he still has to actually cross the line with a bike)
 

Pale Rider

Legendary Member
He hasn't been declared the winner. He's the winner if nothing untoward happens. The last stage is, for GC riders, largely ceremonial but there is still a sprint at the end. Should Contador hit a bit of oil on the road, fall off and be unable to continue he won't win the Giro. If you have any doubts about this, look at the collective relief on the faces of the Tinkoff team once Contador passes the 3km to go mark (although if I remember correctly although he will get the same time if a crash happens in the final 3km he still has to actually cross the line with a bike)
I'm sure this is right, but it seems daft to me.

If they've taken two minutes out of Contador on the previous stage, why not try to take another two minutes out of him on the last one in the hope of winning the race?
 

Smokin Joe

Legendary Member
I'm sure this is right, but it seems daft to me.

If they've taken two minutes out of Contador on the previous stage, why not try to take another two minutes out of him on the last one in the hope of winning the race?
Because it just isn't how road racing works. Riders at this level are evenly matched and on a flat stage taking two minutes out of a rider with a strong supporting team isn't a goer. You see breakaways get ten and twenty minutes ahead of the peloton in lots of stages but that's because the riders in them are no overall threat so even if they are not pulled back before the finish no damage is done to the main contenders. With a concentrated chase they'd be reeled in almost immediately.
 

Pale Rider

Legendary Member
Because it just isn't how road racing works.
Jolly sporting of them not to take time out of Contador on a flat stage.

It's charmingly at odds with the win at all costs mentality prevalent in other professional sports, and almost gives me a warm fuzzy feeling.

Yet pro cyclists are among the most determined and prolific drug cheats in all sport.

Nowt so queer as folk, as they say.
 

martint235

Dog on a bike
Location
Welling
I'm sure this is right, but it seems daft to me.

If they've taken two minutes out of Contador on the previous stage, why not try to take another two minutes out of him on the last one in the hope of winning the race?
Because it just isn't how road racing works. Riders at this level are evenly matched and on a flat stage taking two minutes out of a rider with a strong supporting team isn't a goer. You see breakaways get ten and twenty minutes ahead of the peloton in lots of stages but that's because the riders in them are no overall threat so even if they are not pulled back before the finish no damage is done to the main contenders. With a concentrated chase they'd be reeled in almost immediately.
This basically. If a strong sprinters' team wants to bring back a breakaway they invariably will do so. If you've seen the last couple of stages, you'll have noticed that it's been Astana and Tinkoff driving the peloton. While they'll be there today mainly to protect Aru and Contador from getting caught behind a crash, it'll probably be other teams driving such as the Lottos and Lampre

EDIT: it makes a little more sense (as much as I ever do) now I've included the correct quotes.
 

Smokin Joe

Legendary Member
Jolly sporting of them not to take time out of Contador on a flat stage.

It's charmingly at odds with the win at all costs mentality prevalent in other professional sports, and almost gives me a warm fuzzy feeling.

Yet pro cyclists are among the most determined and prolific drug cheats in all sport.

Nowt so queer as folk, as they say.
There's nothing sporting about it. Time is gained on the mountains and very hilly stages where the peloton can break up. And in the TTs where riders can't use the advantage of their own teams.

If it was possible for someone to ride away from a main field that has no intention of letting him go during a flat stage it would be done, but at that level it isn't.
 
OP
N

novetan

Senior Member
Ok, so stage 21 still to determine the winner. It seems Contador had prematurely celebrated. At least the way those commentators drummed up.
 
Last edited:
Top Bottom