Will I need a wheel true doing after a snapped spoke replacement?

MBosh

Active Member
Will have to have a wheel true done if I have broken a spoke, or can I just get away with having a spoke replacement? Which also brings me to another question and that is I'm not sure if a cycle shop is trying to get more money out of me ( I'll mention no names). I called into this shop and they told me the repair would cost £31 for the broken spoke replacement, but when I later looked at their website it says the following. That they true your wheel for £15 and if they find loose spokes they then charge £1 more for each spoke replacement. So why would I be charged £31 just for a snapped spoke replacement with no wheel true done? I'm a bit confused about all this because first of all I don't know if I need to have the wheel true done after a spoke snaps, but now I'm also not sure if this cycle shop is charging me too much money now? Cheers!
 
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Funny enough I did my first ever spoke replacement last week. Only a 20 min job, off with the cassette, poke the new spoke through the hub, do the nipple up finger tight on rim, put wheel back in drop outs, clip in brake noodle, spin wheel and tighten nipple half turn at a time till the wheel stops rubbing on the brake pad and looks true. Didn't touch any other spokes.

I paid a couple of quid for a twin pack on eBay. So to answer your question: not in my case. My recommendation to you is that you remove the old spoke first then measure it when it's removed before you order replacement. if you have disk brakes then you can hold a marker pen on the frame and let it kiss the section of the rim that is buckled.
 
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All uphill

Senior Member
I think you said in another thread that the spoke broke when you hit an almighty pothole?

It may be that the shop thinks a true would be a good idea after that.
 

Smudge

Über Member
Location
Somerset
I've had the odd spoke break in the past, but i wouldn't dream of paying an LBS do something as simple as that. I just replace the spoke myself and its easy to see yourself if a wheel is out of true.
 

Sharky

Veteran
Location
Kent
Another option - How much is a brand new wheel of the same quality? You can buy single back or front wheels for £50 upwards and you would be getting new bearings, new rims etc. So if you are prepared to pay £31 for a repair job, might be better to buy a new wheel and in your own time, replace the spoke yourself, so you would have a useable spare in the future.

When I was commuting, on occasions, I would be just about to leave the house, to find a tyre had gone flat overnight. Having a ready to go wheel hanging on the garage wall meant that it didn't delay me getting to work.
 

I like Skol

I'm Jay-walking, and I love it...
As with so many things in life, there is no simple answer.

Like others, I have replaced a single spoke and been lucky enough to simply tension the new spoke and get a straight wheel. If, as a result of the impact, the rim has been bent past it's elastic limit and is now permanently deformed it may need further truing to compensate for this (if possible) and achieve an acceptable result.
I suggest try the single spoke approach first and see where that gets you. Don't go silly tight on that one spoke though! If you find resistance to further tightening gets harder or the nipple threads are creaking or the spoke tension is much tighter than the other spokes when plucked then it is time to move attention to the other spokes.
 
OP
M

MBosh

Active Member
@Smudge - I was thinking of trying to fix it myself but I would have had to buy the tools to do it. I usually fix everything else apart from the bottom bracket myself, but I thought what the hell when I realised I would have to buy tools to repair it. I would also of needed to buy a tool to take off my cassette, which I plan on changing myself next year when I need a new chain.

Would you say it's common for spokes to snap because in all honestly it's only ever happened this once to me and that was because I hit a pothole. I ask because I wonder if it's worth investing in some spoke tools?
 

Sharky

Veteran
Location
Kent
- ………. I would have to buy tools to repair it. I would also of needed to buy a tool to take off my cassette, which I plan on changing myself next year when I need a new chain.
Over the years I've been cycling, I've had countless Christmas & Birthdays when I've asked for and have been given cycling stuff and "Wiggle" vouchers - much more useful than socks! So plan ahead and let people know what you really would like for your birthday.
 

robgul

Guru
We used to have 3 prices - front wheel or rear wheel - and then another cost if the cassette or disc rotor had to be removed and replaced (and a hub gear was different again with a new cable set-up)

Rob
 

Smudge

Über Member
Location
Somerset
@Smudge - I was thinking of trying to fix it myself but I would have had to buy the tools to do it. I usually fix everything else apart from the bottom bracket myself, but I thought what the hell when I realised I would have to buy tools to repair it. I would also of needed to buy a tool to take off my cassette, which I plan on changing myself next year when I need a new chain.

Would you say it's common for spokes to snap because in all honestly it's only ever happened this once to me and that was because I hit a pothole. I ask because I wonder if it's worth investing in some spoke tools?
A cassette removal tool and a spoke key will be cheaper than what the LBS want to charge you for this one job. And as you will need a cassette removal tool in the future anyway, its a no brainer to buy these tools now.
Its quite rare for me to have a spoke break, but on those rare occasions they have done, i cant ever remember a wheel going out of true because of it.
But i dont ever have expensive, ultra lightweight, low spoke count wheels on my bikes.
 

Sharky

Veteran
Location
Kent
A cassette removal tool and a spoke key will be cheaper than what the LBS want to charge you for this one job. And as you will need a cassette removal tool in the future anyway, its a no brainer to buy these tools now.
Its quite rare for me to have a spoke break, but on those rare occasions they have done, i cant ever remember a wheel going out of true because of it.
But i dont ever have expensive, ultra lightweight, low spoke count wheels on my bikes.
…. and a chain whip for cassette removal
 
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