Work pond project

Discussion in 'CycleChat Cafe' started by meta lon, 16 May 2018.

  1. meta lon

    meta lon Guru

    Location:
    pboro
    IMG_20180515_141837.jpg IMG_20180515_141559.jpg IMG_20180515_141545.jpg Some of the staff and residents asked if i could build a wildlife pond in the grounds.

    Manager said ok but very little funds available,so if you can do it for under £250 ? Then ok.
    So I've made a start.
    I think I can make something nice in this area with the budget ,I'll just need to be sensible, brick edging and some slate ,pond liner and a few plants for now .
    Then add rocks and knomes later ;).

    I'll add progress pics as I go.
    Start of dig ,150 mm of soil and then it's very hard compacted sub base ,bricks and a load of crushed rubble and ballast Nice.
    So I've brought my breaker in today to help loosen this. I used it for years to break concrete drives and paths,but it's great with a tarmac cutter fitted for loosening hard ground especially after a long dry spell.

    Photos loaded at the top ..grr
     
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  2. Drago

    Drago Guru

    Location:
    Poshamptonshire.
    Looks like an alien spacecraft landed there.
     
    slowwww, raleighnut and meta lon like this.
  3. Tail End Charlie

    Tail End Charlie Guru

    Location:
    Altrincham
    That's a great project, it'll look fab, and the wildlife will thank you.
     
    meta lon likes this.
  4. I like Skol

    I like Skol Hold my beer and watch this......

    Location:
    Ashton-under-Lyne
    Just one concern. You say 'staff and residents', what kind of establishment is this and does the pond need any safety precautions to prevent any vulnerable/less capable residents falling in and coming to harm?

    You might also want to cut a few discreet holes in the bottom of the fence (9"x9" should do it) to let any 'wildlife' to pass through. I remember reading somewhere a while ago that the tightly fenced garden network that is so common nowadays is a huge problem to wildlife.
     
  5. Reiver

    Reiver Legendary Member

    health & Saftey
    I got a large rubber ring at the ready when we started to fill ours, we diddn't need it in the end but it was reassuring that it was there.
    pondfill1_6990.JPG
     
  6. MikeG

    MikeG Veteran

    Location:
    Suffolk
    You've got lots more digging to do. It should be about 3 feet deep.

    q54B17e.jpg

    4JybRZh.jpg
     
    Last edited: 16 May 2018
    Mugshot, postman, raleighnut and 3 others like this.
  7. biggs682

    biggs682 Smile a mile bike provider

    Location:
    Northamptonshire
    @meta lon i hope the local Heron's dont use the whirly gig as a landing post
     
    meta lon and Dave7 like this.
  8. Spiderweb

    Spiderweb Veteran

    Location:
    North Yorkshire
    It's not very deep, if you fill that with water it'll just be like a big puddle!:smile:
     
    meta lon and postman like this.
  9. Dave7

    Dave7 Veteran

    Location:
    Cheshire
    You have one of the basics very wrong.
    You need a gnome now.....not when its established
    He has to get settled in and be there to welcome the wildlife.

    Is there a hose nearby? Its amazing (and annoying) how quickly it evaporates in summer.
    Have you got electrics for a basic pump.......just to help oxygenate it.
     
    User259 likes this.
  10. KneesUp

    KneesUp Veteran

    My parents asked me to dig a pond one summer holiday, but they were a bit sketchy about what size they wanted it - my instructions were to dig a pond-sized hole where the old greenhouse had been. When they came in from work I'd dug a hole roughly 6 foot wide, 10 feet long and about 5 1/2 foot deep in the middle where I'd tried to get to the water table.
     
  11. Dave7

    Dave7 Veteran

    Location:
    Cheshire
    [QUOTE 5245518, member: 259"]You really don't need a pump if it's enouigh volume of water. We have a biggish pond which is full of fish and newts and the odd grass snake, and it's fine. We never put the fish in there, but apparently the eggs arrive on herons' feet. And the herons do an impressive job in keeping their numbers down as well.[/QUOTE]
    True.......that is why I said "helps oxygenate".
    Didnt realise that about how fish eggs can get there.
     
    Saluki likes this.
  12. Piemaster

    Piemaster Guru

    Location:
    UK City of Culture
    I was more thinking "one step too far back while hanging out the washing..."
     
  13. OP
    OP
    meta lon

    meta lon Guru

    Location:
    pboro
    It's a wildlife pond Not fish.
    I'll put a little chain fence up .

    This pond is tucked away so not really a danger to our residents.
    The grounds are quite large and have picket fences and open areas @I like Skol so no prob for wildlife.

    It will be about 450-500 mm deep so just enough for frogs newts and plants.
    If any small fish move in they may or may not survive.

    My own pond is the same and that seems to work fine oxygenating wise,just needs the right plants
     
  14. Reiver

    Reiver Legendary Member

    we had a small pond at the front that was only about 18" deep and it worked OK. The one at the back (pic above) is 32" deep. We have vast numbers of frogs, and at the moment there is large shawls of tadpoles.
     
    meta lon likes this.
  15. Welsh wheels

    Welsh wheels Lycra king

    Location:
    South Wales
    Looking good...
     
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