Bike cleaning in the winter months

If you feel the need to break the chain for ultrasonic or solvent cleaning, get 2 chains. Keep one clean, dry and oiled ready for a quick change.
 

simongt

Veteran
Location
Norwich
One of the lads I work with recently bought a secondhand road bike for commuting to work. Hand it to him, he's going at it rain, hail & shine. As said bike didn't come with mudguards, the whole of the lower part of the bike & drivetrain gets covered in roadmuck which he has to clean off on an almost daily basis. :wacko:
Let's hear it for decent mudguards - ! :thumbsup:
 

iluvmybike

Über Member
:bravo:Mudguards - oh yes they are a real help and they keep the crap off your clothing as well. I hate seeing those without 'guards with that filthy gritty strip up their backs. If bikes are not cleaned regularly and things like pivot points on derailleurs & brakes go unlubed they will start to corrode and stick, mucky brake pad and rims mean they wear more quickly. So yes, my bikes gets cleaned regularly even if it is really cold - quick wash-off outside with hose, bike cleaner & brush down, rinse then let it drip dry while I have a brew then in the shed and ready for a bit of a wipe down and lube. And no, I am not 'bored' or not 'have anything better to do'. That's what I choose to spend a bit of time on as my bike gives me a great deal back :angel:
 
We use that on our EE Lightning that I am an engineering team member for. She is stored outside and this stuff has kept all the mechanical bits free (including the engines). It is superb stuff but not cheap.
Yeah its not cheap but if it protects aircraft on carries at sea :becool:

edit: just googled EE Lightning :blush: guessing you know about the aircraft bit then :ohmy:
 

Gixxerman

Guru
Location
Market Rasen
edit: just googled EE Lightning :blush: guessing you know about the aircraft bit then :ohmy:
Yeah. We have a live aircraft up at the old Binbrook airfield (service code XR724). She hasn't run for about 10 years now as a lot of the enigineering team left and some sadly died. It was bought by a consortium of enthusiasts (The Lightning Association) when it went out of service. I think we got it for £2000. It was based at Warton when she left service. That gave us a issue as how to get it to Binbrook. Road transport was out as that would mean chopping the wings and vertical stabiliser, which would mean that it would be the end of it as a live aircraft, and would scupper our (then) plans to try and return her to flight (no chance now BTW). So after much head scratching and a kind offer from BAE systems (the OEM), they offered us a loan of 2 flight certified engines as the ones in it were not flight certified having exceeded their service life. If we could do an engine swap and get it through tests, BAE would do a one-off ferry flight to Binbrook. So, a team of ex-lightning ground crew who were part of our engineering team went to Warton and performed the engine swap. It passed all tests and it was ready for it's flight to Binbrook. However, there was a problem. For BAE to fly it, they had to own it. So we made a gentleman's agreement to sell it BAE for £1 and they would then sell it back to us for £1 upon landing at Binbrook. So it was on 23 July 1992 BAE's chief test pilot flew her into her spirtital home of Binbrook. She then had her original engines refitted (they had travelled by road) and the loaned engines were returned to BAE systems. We hope to have her running again soon. We would have been close now, but the pandemic put a stop to the engineering meets. You can check our progress on our Facebook group (search for XR724 Lightning F6).
 
Yeah. We have a live aircraft up at the old Binbrook airfield (service code XR724). She hasn't run for about 10 years now as a lot of the enigineering team left and some sadly died. It was bought by a consortium of enthusiasts (The Lightning Association) when it went out of service. I think we got it for £2000. It was based at Warton when she left service. That gave us a issue as how to get it to Binbrook. Road transport was out as that would mean chopping the wings and vertical stabiliser, which would mean that it would be the end of it as a live aircraft, and would scupper our (then) plans to try and return her to flight (no chance now BTW). So after much head scratching and a kind offer from BAE systems (the OEM), they offered us a loan of 2 flight certified engines as the ones in it were not flight certified having exceeded their service life. If we could do an engine swap and get it through tests, BAE would do a one-off ferry flight to Binbrook. So, a team of ex-lightning ground crew who were part of our engineering team went to Warton and performed the engine swap. It passed all tests and it was ready for it's flight to Binbrook. However, there was a problem. For BAE to fly it, they had to own it. So we made a gentleman's agreement to sell it BAE for £1 and they would then sell it back to us for £1 upon landing at Binbrook. So it was on 23 July 1992 BAE's chief test pilot flew her into her spirtital home of Binbrook. She then had her original engines refitted (they had travelled by road) and the loaned engines were returned to BAE systems. We hope to have her running again soon. We would have been close now, but the pandemic put a stop to the engineering meets. You can check our progress on our Facebook group (search for XR724 Lightning F6).
Warton is just down road from me. Will google and have a shufty, sounds fantastic 👍
 

palinurus

Velo, boulot, dodo
Location
Watford
I've largely given up cleaning my bikes at home in winter- too cold, might have a quick go at one if it's like +8 or something.

I give the rims a wipe down then run the chain through a rag and oil it, and I do it at work where it's warm - all the managers (except me) are working from home now anyway.

Very unusually I had to rinse down the Elephant bike yesterday because I used the local Sustrans path to go to a lock & key shop. Cyclocross-style mud, had to put my trainers in the machine when I got home. I usually avoid it, then a couple of years pass and I think 'ah, it won't be that bad'.
 

simongt

Veteran
Location
Norwich
On the point of 'decent mudguards', one thing I've not seen in years are the 'shortie' mudguards that were popular on road bikes back in the day. They were, as far as I'm aware there to keep road debris off the mechs of the front & back brakes, but the only place that seem to have any available are vintage ones on E-Bay - ! Surely the same logic still applies, but why don't we see them available today - ? :whistle:
 
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