Bike shop told me to use thread lock on pedals

Discussion in 'Bicycle Mechanics and Repairs' started by Alembicbassman, 14 Apr 2010.

  1. Zoiders

    Zoiders New Member

    Location:
    Ice Station Zebra
    I have had to use a long steel bar and a pedal spanner too many times to remove pedals that have had white grease on them on bikes built up elsewhere, you can see the solid crap that comes back out of the thread once you get the pedal out, same with seat pins, white grease welds them in place.

    Brown grease comes in all kind of weights, even the lighter stuff does not mess up a perfectly good bike the way white grease does.
     
  2. henshaw11

    henshaw11 Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Walton-On-Thames
    Monkeys tightening up the pedals mebbe ?
    Not using enough might be an issue - and perhaps it might be a bit rubbish long term, but as for *causing* corrosion I'm a bit sceptical - still, YMMV (and obviously does). Sure the white stuff wasn't ally oxide ?
    In the days I used to use it (unless you wanted to buy a big tub of Castrol, that was normally what yer LBS sold in small quantities), I used to strip down the bike every few months anyway. That said, I didn't remove the pedals very often...
     
  3. Zoiders

    Zoiders New Member

    Location:
    Ice Station Zebra
    People leave pedals on for years, white grease seizes them every time.

    Newtons law - if it was so tight you needed a big 4ft long bar to remove it that would mean somone used a 4 foot long pedal spanner to fit it...unless the grease made it seize of course.

    White grease - it's just generaly crap and cause more proplems than it solves.
     
  4. Jables156

    Jables156 New Member

    Location:
    Borders
    I always use Copper slip but not sure if that has been banned now as its carcinogenic (?), we used to use it all the time at work for bolts on stuff that was stripped down on a regular basis, certainly did the trick !
     
  5. henshaw11

    henshaw11 Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Walton-On-Thames
    >unless the grease made it seize of course.

    As an engineer I'd say that could be an assumption too far ;)
    As (I think) I suggested, there's a difference between the grease *making* it seize, and being sufficiently rubbish that it doesn't do the job you hope it does..

    I think we're agreed that there's probably better stuff to use :smile:
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice