Bike storage at work... who's liable for damage?

I know they don't have to provide parking but there's two places within the store that we could park our bikes where they'd be less at risk of damage than the warehouse.

If my bike is damaged by a member of staff doing their job, I'll be putting a claim in for damages against my employer.

I'm not planing on asking the area manager anything... I'm going to tell him that in the event of any damage to our bikes, we'll be putting claims in.
If that was the case and I was the manager it would make me ask who gave you permission to bring bikes in to begin with and secondly I would be making it clear that you did not have permission to bring them in again.

The best person to ask is your manager and then put them where he tells you.
 

cyberknight

As long as I breathe, I attack.
I think the crux of this is a car park is designed for parking cars whilst at work. shopping etc , unless they can provide somewhere where there is little chance of damage then they haven't a leg to stand on , sticking in a busy overcrowded space is asking for trouble
 

SkipdiverJohn

Über Member
Location
London
If I'm forced to store it where it might get damaged and it does get damaged, I'll be putting a claim in and we'll see what happens. Hopefully, having a word with the area manager and pointing out that a buckled wheel will cost £100 and a damaged frame will cost upwards of £1500 will stop him from being a nobber
What will likely happen is your employer will tell you to go take a running jump, and then will ban ALL bicycles from being brought on site. I'm sure that will make you popular with your colleagues. You chose to use an expensive bike to commute on, that's your lookout. You could just as easily have bought a £25 hack bike and ride that to work instead. The self-entitled "I ride an expensive bike so I demand to park it wherever I want" attitude wouldn't cut any ice with me. I'd tell you in no uncertain terms to leave your bike out on the street if you used that approach on me.

Making it known the cost of damage to your bike maybe coming his way may move him..
The simplest solution to potential liability issues is to simply prohibit personal property like bikes being bought on to work premises. Problem solved.

I'm not planing on asking the area manager anything... I'm going to tell him that in the event of any damage to our bikes, we'll be putting claims in.
If that was the case and I was the manager it would make me ask who gave you permission to bring bikes in to begin with and secondly I would be making it clear that you did not have permission to bring them in again.
You're just asking for trouble. Management could just ban storing bikes at work. You then try to bring a bike in regardless or complain if it gets damaged, and it could become a disciplinary matter for misconduct. On the other hand you could ride a cheap hack bike, park it wherever the manager will tolerate it, and don't rock the boat. If you insist on shitstirring because you want to prove a point, you'll likely come off the loser.
 

classic33

Legendary Member
What will likely happen is your employer will tell you to go take a running jump, and then will ban ALL bicycles from being brought on site. I'm sure that will make you popular with your colleagues. You chose to use an expensive bike to commute on, that's your lookout. You could just as easily have bought a £25 hack bike and ride that to work instead. The self-entitled "I ride an expensive bike so I demand to park it wherever I want" attitude wouldn't cut any ice with me. I'd tell you in no uncertain terms to leave your bike out on the street if you used that approach on me.

The simplest solution to potential liability issues is to simply prohibit personal property like bikes being bought on to work premises. Problem solved.

You're just asking for trouble. Management could just ban storing bikes at work. You then try to bring a bike in regardless or complain if it gets damaged, and it could become a disciplinary matter for misconduct. On the other hand you could ride a cheap hack bike, park it wherever the manager will tolerate it, and don't rock the boat. If you insist on shitstirring because you want to prove a point, you'll likely come off the loser.
One problem is the C2W scheme, under which the bike was purchased. @MontyVeda can correct me on this part, if I've misread his posts. Bike purchased under the scheme has to be new, from a recognised retailer operating the scheme, and then it's expected to be used to cycle to work.

Rules out getting a "hack bike" for £25, or thereabouts, from someone selling secondhand, to get rid off it. Not certain of the distance travelled to work, but "hack bike" or not, if damaged at work to the extent that it was unrideable, how is he supposed to get home?

Not everyone works only when public transport is running or where it may be running. Are you suggesting he stays at work if the bike is damaged at work, if he's no public transport.

It would save him the trip back the following shift that much is true.
 
OP
MontyVeda

MontyVeda

a short-tempered ill-controlled small-minded troll
One of the deputy managers is refusing to park his bike (recently purchased on C2W) in the warehouse because of the increased risk of damage. Mine wasn't purchased on the C2W scheme, but that's beside the point. I am currently parking my bike in the warehouse as instructed until i speak with the area manager to share my concerns. If the AM gets arsey about it, I'll just start looking for work elsewhere. He's not the only employer in town.

edited to add... bike is the only feasible means of transport for me. There's no buses at 5.30 am and given the choice between a 10 minute ride or a 35 minute walk, I'll just go somewhere else.
 

classic33

Legendary Member
If I employed you to do a job, I'd agree to pay you X amount of wages in return for you turning up for work and doing Y amount of hours. How you get to and from work, and what means of transport you use, is your problem not mine. C2W is an irrelevance.
The employer is party to the C2W scheme, so relevant to the means of transport used.
 

Drago

Flouncing Nobber
If I employed you to do a job, I'd agree to pay you X amount of wages in return for you turning up for work and doing Y amount of hours. How you get to and from work, and what means of transport you use, is your problem not mine. C2W is an irrelevance.
I'm sure the cream or the crop will be queueing around the block to work for a caring employer like you.
 

BurningLegs

Senior Member
If I employed you to do a job, I'd agree to pay you X amount of wages in return for you turning up for work and doing Y amount of hours. How you get to and from work, and what means of transport you use, is your problem not mine. C2W is an irrelevance.
I agree to a point, but good employers would recognise that good staff will be recruited and retained more easily if you accommodate their needs.

This example is bike storage, but there are lots of others e.g ability to work from home, flexible hours, on site facilities e.g canteen or showers etc. The list goes on, and I don’t think employers should be forced to provide these “extras” but the good ones will recognise the value in doing so.

As an employee this would be something that makes me consider leaving the company to work elsewhere.
 

vickster

Legendary Member
The employer is party to the C2W scheme, so relevant to the means of transport used.
A Government scheme presumably included in the benefits package at Head Office/Corporate level, presumably not a store to store decision. Maybe the OP should take it to the top on that basis if corporate CSR policy is to encourage cycling. Large businesses usually welcome employee engagement. I assume it’s not the Partnership organisation Waitrose?
 
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