Bike storage at work... who's liable for damage?

OP
MontyVeda

MontyVeda

a short-tempered ill-controlled small-minded troll
If i had room for two bikes in my 1st floor flat, I might have two bikes. As things are, I have one bike.
 
I am currently parking my bike in the warehouse as instructed until i speak with the area manager to share my concerns. If the AM gets arsey about it, I'll just start looking for work elsewhere. He's not the only employer in town.
That's exactly the right attitude. If employers treat their staff like market labour, employees can do the very the same with their employer. A good buisness operates with a social conscience, those ones that don't will not retain their best staff and their business (effectiveness and productivity) will eventually suffer as a result. In a market economy, that means the competition attract better staff, and you go out of buisness. Very short sighted attitude portrayed by @SkipdiverJohn

It's no coincidence I have stuck with my present employer longer than any other, they may not offer the absolute best price for my labour, but then again, they pay in other ways as they are incredibly flexible with working hours which means I don't need to pay for childcare (which often means you have to sell your first born to pay for), they offer a range of facilities for commuter cyclists, which keeps me fit and engaged in the workplace. It's a win win arrangement for the employer/employee.
 
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vickster

Legendary Member
there's a lamp post on the pavement... but buying a crap bike to leave chained to it is not the solution I'm looking for.
Fair enough
 

SkipdiverJohn

Über Member
Location
London
I agree to a point, but good employers would recognise that good staff will be recruited and retained more easily if you accommodate their needs. .
The employer isn't refusing to allow bikes on the premises, they are simply dictating where they will be allowed - and the OP doesn't like this because they have an expensive machine and a precious attitude. At the end of the day, the employer runs the show, not the employee. Accept it or be your own boss.
The argument about recruitment and retention only holds water up to a point. It depends on the nature of the job, skills, experience, and the hassle and cost factors of replacing staff who leave. If I was employing staff, I would obviously like to keep hold of good reliable ones, but it wouldn't extend to tolerating anyone who was intent on simply being a pain in the arse.
 

classic33

Legendary Member
And if after leaving the bike in the place, as pointed out, it being there is given as the cause of an accident, who should be blamed.

Pretty certain there will be "clearways" in any warehouse that are required to be kept clear for forklift and pallet truck movement. Have those driving the forklifts/pallet trucks been informed about the new arraingments?
 
OP
MontyVeda

MontyVeda

a short-tempered ill-controlled small-minded troll
The employer isn't refusing to allow bikes on the premises, they are simply dictating where they will be allowed - and the OP doesn't like this because they have an expensive machine and a precious attitude. At the end of the day, the employer runs the show, not the employee. Accept it or be your own boss.
The argument about recruitment and retention only holds water up to a point. It depends on the nature of the job, skills, experience, and the hassle and cost factors of replacing staff who leave. If I was employing staff, I would obviously like to keep hold of good reliable ones, but it wouldn't extend to tolerating anyone who was intent on simply being a pain in the arse.
yeah but, judging by your inflexible attitude towards your hypothetical employees... it'd be the staff choosing whether to stay or go rather than you. You're not going to win employer of the year anytime soon I'm afraid.
 

tom73

Über Member
Location
Yorkshire
I'd not bother too much about employing staff as you'd probably go bust from high recruitment cost even poor staff cost money.
Or been taken to the cleaners by some tribal or another.
 

Drago

Flouncing Nobber
Not to mention that some people can be quite sadistic, and jf you treat staff like crap then nasty things can happen. Chap I know works at a major airport and was telling me about a guy that was an utter nodder. First someone simply chinned him, and that didn't get the message across. Then when he was inside an aircraft they decided to do some kind of fuselage test and accidentally took him to a simulated 40,000 feet and the message didn't get across. Then as he was stepping out of one aircraft the boarding ramp thing was accidentally moved and he fell 25 feet and broke both legs...and he still didn't get the hint.

Pithing people off at work unecessarily is dodgy cos theres always some sociopath who'll do something unpleasant back.
 
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