Bike storage at work... who's liable for damage?

SkipdiverJohn

Über Member
Location
London
Not to mention that some people can be quite sadistic, and jf you treat staff like crap then nasty things can happen. Pithing people off at work unecessarily is dodgy cos theres always some sociopath who'll do something unpleasant back.
I wouldn't disagree about going out of your way to piss people off for no reason - but at the end of the day if you work for someone you have to accept that they are the ones who set the rules and you either live with them, or you go and work somewhere else. You of all people will understand that you can't have staff choosing which rules they fancy complying with and which ones they don't. There's a bit of give and take in most situations, but in this case the OP wants it all his own way. He's previously got away with storing his bike somewhere that suits him, and when that arrangement is changed by someone higher up the food chain than himself, he's spat his dummy and had a tantrum. hence all the "if my bike gets damaged I'll be sticking a claim in" stuff. The employer would probably rather not have any bikes in the building at all in case someone falls over one and has an accident, so the concession of allowing them in the warehouse would have been considered a more than fair compromise by them. However, the response by the OP is just that to be expected by those who insist on taking expensive bikes into risky locations. They think because they have spent a couple of grand or more on their bike, not twenty quid, that they should be afforded special privileges like getting to choose where you park it. It's exactly the same attitude displayed by those cyclists who ride a really valuable bike and expect to be permitted to take it inside a shop or café with them, rather than leave it at risk outside with all the cheaper machinery.
 
They think because they have spent a couple of grand or more on their bike, not twenty quid, that they should be afforded special privileges like getting to choose where you park it

can you point out where the op has said this ,or even hinted that he should have special privileges JUST BECAUSE they paid more than twenty quid for a bike,...….it would be helpful if you could because ive reread the thread but I cant find it. he says he wants somewhere safe from theft and damage but doesn't state how expensive/inexpensive his bike was.
 

vickster

Legendary Member
can you point out where the op has said this ,or even hinted that he should have special privileges JUST BECAUSE they paid more than twenty quid for a bike,...….it would be helpful if you could because ive reread the thread but I cant find it. he says he wants somewhere safe from theft and damage but doesn't state how expensive/inexpensive his bike was.
Post #7 gives an indication of wheel and frameset replacement costs (unless also purely hypothetical)
 

SkipdiverJohn

Über Member
Location
London
can you point out where the op has said this ,or even hinted that he should have special privileges JUST BECAUSE they paid more than twenty quid for a bike,...….it would be helpful if you could because ive reread the thread but I cant find it. he says he wants somewhere safe from theft and damage but doesn't state how expensive/inexpensive his bike was.
Read the bit about repairs to a damaged frame costing £1500. True, he doesn't state exactly how much the bike cost, but any bike with a frame in that price range is an expensive bike, and I very much doubt it's been built up with low-price mechanical components either.
No-one in their right mind would wear a top of the range Swiss watch for a shift working on a building site, they'd buy a £10 one from Argos, so they wouldn't cry too much if it got damaged. Same goes for commuting bikes. If there's a real risk of someone driving into it when parked and making it resemble a banana. you don't take your Sunday best one to work. You make do with an old rat bike and if it gets wrecked you take the £20 hit on the chin and go and get another cheap hack to replace it.
 

vickster

Legendary Member
Read the bit about repairs to a damaged frame costing £1500. True, he doesn't state exactly how much the bike cost, but any bike with a frame in that price range is an expensive bike, and I very much doubt it's been built up with low-price mechanical components either.
No-one in their right mind would wear a top of the range Swiss watch for a shift working on a building site, they'd buy a £10 one from Argos, so they wouldn't cry too much if it got damaged. Same goes for commuting bikes. If there's a real risk of someone driving into it when parked and making it resemble a banana. you don't take your Sunday best one to work. You make do with an old rat bike and if it gets wrecked you take the £20 hit on the chin and go and get another cheap hack to replace it.
He does also say he only has room in his home to keep one bike. And who only wants a rat bike in that situation (except maybe you?)
 

classic33

Legendary Member
I wouldn't disagree about going out of your way to piss people off for no reason - but at the end of the day if you work for someone you have to accept that they are the ones who set the rules and you either live with them, or you go and work somewhere else. You of all people will understand that you can't have staff choosing which rules they fancy complying with and which ones they don't. There's a bit of give and take in most situations, but in this case the OP wants it all his own way. He's previously got away with storing his bike somewhere that suits him, and when that arrangement is changed by someone higher up the food chain than himself, he's spat his dummy and had a tantrum. hence all the "if my bike gets damaged I'll be sticking a claim in" stuff. The employer would probably rather not have any bikes in the building at all in case someone falls over one and has an accident, so the concession of allowing them in the warehouse would have been considered a more than fair compromise by them. However, the response by the OP is just that to be expected by those who insist on taking expensive bikes into risky locations. They think because they have spent a couple of grand or more on their bike, not twenty quid, that they should be afforded special privileges like getting to choose where you park it. It's exactly the same attitude displayed by those cyclists who ride a really valuable bike and expect to be permitted to take it inside a shop or café with them, rather than leave it at risk outside with all the cheaper machinery.
As is the manager, who seems to have a point to make.

The value of the bike is irrelevant to the situation. The bike is a means of transport to and from work.

I spent three and a half years travelling to work at unsocial hours, on roads where there was no public transport. Taxi four times a day to cover the same distance would have cost more than I was being paid. And it'd have been no quicker, using the same roads I was using.

Stop fixating on what price may have been paid by others, purely and simply because they may have spent more than you approve of. It's quite easy get a cheap bike. I've given away more than I care to think about over the years. To people who then used them as their introduction to cycling.

One problem we, as cyclists, face is that we are seen as not able to cover the distances we do.

I've used the cycles, and parked them at work, where one manager decided it should be once I got there. I'd then another manager complaining about where it was left. Place approved by another manager, but not where they wanted it leaving. Choice was theirs, they could follow H&S, do a risk assessment and prove it wasn't safe. Insist on it being left outside, blocking shared access and a fire exit, whilst looking for someone else to cover the early morning start. I was one of two willing, and able to get there out of 11 other employees. The other didn't last long.
 
Read the bit about repairs to a damaged frame costing £1500. True, he doesn't state exactly how much the bike cost, but any bike with a frame in that price range is an expensive bike, and I very much doubt it's been built up with low-price mechanical components either.
No-one in their right mind would wear a top of the range Swiss watch for a shift working on a building site, they'd buy a £10 one from Argos, so they wouldn't cry too much if it got damaged. Same goes for commuting bikes. If there's a real risk of someone driving into it when parked and making it resemble a banana. you don't take your Sunday best one to work. You make do with an old rat bike and if it gets wrecked you take the £20 hit on the chin and go and get another cheap hack to replace it.


yes I know all that, but once again , as per the watch or rat bike analogy, anyone doing something that YOU wouldn't do is wrong,
now can you show me where the op says he wants special treatment,(now here comes the phrase) ...JUST BECAUSE...his bike was expensive,....maybe ...just maybe he would want his bike safe from theft or damage whatever its worth, but once again because he paid more than you would , you tell him hes wrong and he should have bought a cheap bike.
you really do seem to have a problem with people spending their own money however they choose, not once has he asked for special treatment for the reason you regularly trot out
 
OP
MontyVeda

MontyVeda

a short-tempered ill-controlled small-minded troll
I wouldn't disagree about going out of your way to piss people off for no reason - but at the end of the day if you work for someone you have to accept that they are the ones who set the rules and you either live with them, or you go and work somewhere else. You of all people will understand that you can't have staff choosing which rules they fancy complying with and which ones they don't. There's a bit of give and take in most situations, but in this case the OP wants it all his own way. He's previously got away with storing his bike somewhere that suits him, and when that arrangement is changed by someone higher up the food chain than himself, he's spat his dummy and had a tantrum. hence all the "if my bike gets damaged I'll be sticking a claim in" stuff. The employer would probably rather not have any bikes in the building at all in case someone falls over one and has an accident, so the concession of allowing them in the warehouse would have been considered a more than fair compromise by them. However, the response by the OP is just that to be expected by those who insist on taking expensive bikes into risky locations. They think because they have spent a couple of grand or more on their bike, not twenty quid, that they should be afforded special privileges like getting to choose where you park it. It's exactly the same attitude displayed by those cyclists who ride a really valuable bike and expect to be permitted to take it inside a shop or café with them, rather than leave it at risk outside with all the cheaper machinery.
it's not just me... today another deputy manager said he won't store his bike in the warehouse either. What you fail to understand is the warehouse is the worst place to put them, so please, climb down of your high horse.
 
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OP
MontyVeda

MontyVeda

a short-tempered ill-controlled small-minded troll
can you point out where the op has said this ,or even hinted that he should have special privileges JUST BECAUSE they paid more than twenty quid for a bike,...….it would be helpful if you could because ive reread the thread but I cant find it. he says he wants somewhere safe from theft and damage but doesn't state how expensive/inexpensive his bike was.
my bike is a 90's orange P7, cost around £700 new. Todays price for that model is upwards of £1500. If i were to put a claim in, it'd be for a new bike, not a 2nd hand one.
 
Folding bike might be nice, keep it in the flat, ride it to work, fold it up where specified.
it's not just me... today another deputy manager said he won't store his bike in the warehouse either. What you fail to understand is the warehouse is the worst place to put them, so please, climb down of your high horse.
P.S., Let's not get too personal.
Behold, how good and how pleasant it is for brethren to dwell together in unity!
 
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classic33

Legendary Member
Read the bit about repairs to a damaged frame costing £1500. True, he doesn't state exactly how much the bike cost, but any bike with a frame in that price range is an expensive bike, and I very much doubt it's been built up with low-price mechanical components either.
No-one in their right mind would wear a top of the range Swiss watch for a shift working on a building site, they'd buy a £10 one from Argos, so they wouldn't cry too much if it got damaged. Same goes for commuting bikes. If there's a real risk of someone driving into it when parked and making it resemble a banana. you don't take your Sunday best one to work. You make do with an old rat bike and if it gets wrecked you take the £20 hit on the chin and go and get another cheap hack to replace it.
How often would you replace a 'hack bike" before you realised that the amount being spent was more than the price for one bike.

Using your watch analogy as an example. I bought a £40 watch for everyday wear, including work. Which was wide and varied manual work.

There's a saying about buy cheap, buy twice.
 

vickster

Legendary Member
How often would you replace a 'hack bike" before you realised that the amount being spent was more than the price for one bike.

Using your watch analogy as an example. I bought a £40 watch for everyday wear, including work. Which was wide and varied manual work.

There's a saying about buy cheap, buy twice.
£40 is still a cheap watch. You can easily spend £4k. That’s your £40 hack bike and your 4K carbon roadbike (high mid range)
 
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