Fixed Geared Bikes

Rockn Robin

Senior Member
Location
Arizona
I've often wondered what it would be like to ride a fixed gear bike. The gear that it's fixed in, would it be comparable to, say, the third gear on a 3-speed Sturmey Archer, for example.

Can you change it to a geared bike by adding a cassette, or is the rear forks too narrow at the bottom?
 

Ian H

I am an ancient randonneur, & I stop often for tea
Location
East Devon
'Fixed' means no freewheel. When the wheel turns, the pedals turn. and v.v. You choose the gear ratio to suit yourself.
 
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Rockn Robin

Rockn Robin

Senior Member
Location
Arizona
'Fixed' means no freewheel. When the wheel turns, the pedals turn. and v.v. You choose the gear ratio to suit yourself.
I heard that there are some models that have a freewheel. I'm not too sure what you mean by chose the gear ratio that suits oneself. I was wondering that if you pedal this sort of bike, would it provide the same pedal resistance if you were trying to pedal a bike in third gear of a Sturmey Archer type hub. Just to get some idea as to how it would feel like riding.
 

Phaeton

Grumpy Old Barstool
Location
Oop North (ish)
On the fixed wheel bike you have a single cog on the back wheel, in the UK these do not usually have a freewheel on it, but logically there is no reason not to other than it breaks the ethos of a 'Fixxie' You would choose your single gear when building the bike to suit your needs, you could then change this at a later date but it's a stripdown & rebuild, not whilst riding scenerio.
 

Threevok

This space available to rent
Location
South Wales
You are referring to a single speed / Fixed bike

The "resistance" as you put it, depends on the size of the rear sprocket and front chainring you choose.

I continually swap mine around depending on what I am going to use the bike for that day
 
I heard that there are some models that have a freewheel. I'm not too sure what you mean by chose the gear ratio that suits oneself. I was wondering that if you pedal this sort of bike, would it provide the same pedal resistance if you were trying to pedal a bike in third gear of a Sturmey Archer type hub. Just to get some idea as to how it would feel like riding.
you choose what chainring and rear cog you want (within reason) giving you a gear that suits you. could be somewhat higher or lower according to fitness and hilly ness of your home area
 
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Rockn Robin

Rockn Robin

Senior Member
Location
Arizona
On the fixed wheel bike you have a single cog on the back wheel, in the UK these do not usually have a freewheel on it, but logically there is no reason not to other than it breaks the ethos of a 'Fixxie' You would choose your single gear when building the bike to suit your needs, you could then change this at a later date but it's a stripdown & rebuild, not whilst riding scenerio.
I see, so theoretically you have various hubs to chose from. I know this might sound rather redundant to the point of having a ‘fixxie,’ but are there multi geared hubs, other than the three speed type, available these days? Another words, more than three? Surely there must be now that technology has progressed.
 

loopybike

Über Member
Multi gear hubs are common. My brother has a 14 gear hub set on his touring bike. His reason was durability as he was cycling across South America. I'm not sure they are any more durable but it worked faultless, as it still is.
 
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Rockn Robin

Rockn Robin

Senior Member
Location
Arizona
You are referring to a single speed / Fixed bike

The "resistance" as you put it, depends on the size of the rear sprocket and front chainring you choose.

I continually swap mine around depending on what I am going to use the bike for that day
Not having or ridden a fixed gear bike, but wouldn’t that be a bit of a bother. Why not have a multi-speed freewheel hub. Or, perhaps a two or three speed front chainring. I’m just saying. I’m not trying to make any derogatory remarks regarding fixxie bikes. Obviously they have a huge following. But I’m just curious.

If you change out the rear hub, then you must have a collection of rear wheels.
 
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Rockn Robin

Rockn Robin

Senior Member
Location
Arizona
You may be missing the point of fixed wheel bikes. Less technology is interesting. Honest!
No, I do understand where you are coming from. The simplicity of it sounds rather intriguing. All of this is curiosity on my part not knowing much about them or have I tried to ride them. Do not city messenger riders use fixxie?
 
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Rockn Robin

Rockn Robin

Senior Member
Location
Arizona
Multi gear hubs are common. My brother has a 14 gear hub set on his touring bike. His reason was durability as he was cycling across South America. I'm not sure they are any more durable but it worked faultless, as it still is.
Really? A 14 geared rear hub! I Had no idea you could get such a multi-speed hub like that. With so many gears, I’m wondering why they don’t use them for racing. I’m curious on that one. Perhaps it’s because they don’t shift as fast on the fly.
 

Old jon

Veteran
Location
Leeds
Do not city messenger riders use fixxie?

The few I see tend to use single speed, i.e. with a freewheel. Mine was bought with a double sided hub, freewheel one side and fixed the other. After riding it back from the shop, in January 2017, I turned the wheel to use the fixed sprocket. Then started lowering the gearing over a period of weeks until I found a ratio I could just about ride. I like to think that riding fixed improves my fitness, but it is fun anyway . . .
 
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Rockn Robin

Rockn Robin

Senior Member
Location
Arizona
The few I see tend to use single speed, i.e. with a freewheel. Mine was bought with a double sided hub, freewheel one side and fixed the other. After riding it back from the shop, in January 2017, I turned the wheel to use the fixed sprocket. Then started lowering the gearing over a period of weeks until I found a ratio I could just about ride. I like to think that riding fixed improves my fitness, but it is fun anyway . . .
So, one can make adjustments to the actual fixed gear hub? This is quite interesting. If that is so, can you simply stop at the side of the road to do that? I can see this as a great way to train, and improve fitness, like you mentioned.
 
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