Giro Helmet Choice

jimbut

Well-Known Member
Gonna replace my 7 yr old Giro which has given stirling service...
.... it`s getting a bit long in the tooth. I have sort of narrowed it down to either the Giro Ionos or the much lighter Prolight. My sticking ( or deciding point ) may be the fact that my current lid weighs 239g exactly. I love the look of the Ionos BUT think it weighs around the 300g mark. Anyone have any experience of either of these 2 lids ? Ta for all comments.
 

e-rider

crappy member
Location
South West
no exp. but I always go Giro too - my latest is a fantastic fit
 

PpPete

Guru
Location
Chandler's Ford
But if they fit your head they are (arguably) safer than a SNELL certified helmet which doesnt fit your head and therefore doesn't get worn.

(Steps down from platform and runs for nearest slit trench, rapidly cramming tin hat on!)
 

giant man

New Member
Location
Essex innit?
I have the Ionos which is fine and I couldn't care less about the Snell rating. The only choice you have of Snell helmets is the ugly Specialised thing.
 

fossyant

Ride It Like You Stole It!
Location
South Manchester
Bell Sweep and Volt are good top end helmets if the Giro's don't fit your head. If you get the pro-light, you'll have to tell us about the retention system....looks quite minimal.
 
porkypete said:
But if they fit your head they are (arguably) safer than a SNELL certified helmet which doesnt fit your head and therefore doesn't get worn.

(Steps down from platform and runs for nearest slit trench, rapidly cramming tin hat on!)
Hence

"Giro helmets are NOT Snell certified"

Not:

"Don't buy a Giro helmet"
 
giant man said:
I have the Ionos which is fine and I couldn't care less about the Snell rating. The only choice you have of Snell helmets is the ugly Specialised thing.
You really need to look wider - there are over 200 helmets that are Snell Rated and some dozen or so manafacturers.

However you do of course have the choice ignore the standards and to accept a lower level of protection if you wish.
 

kyuss

Veteran
Location
Edinburgh
Cunobelin said:
However you do of course have the choice ignore the standards and to accept a lower level of protection if you wish.
Non-Snell certified helmets don't necessarily have less protection. Snell certification is an independent test that has to be paid for and a lot of manufacturers don't bother, relying on their own in-house testing procedures and local government/transport/safety certification. Just because a helmet isn't Snell certified doesn't mean it failed the test and is less safe, just that it didn't take the test in the first place.

I'd imagine any mid to high end helmet from the likes of Giro, Met etc are tested just as rigorously as any Snell certified helmet is.
 

hubgearfreak

Über Member
Cunobelin said:
However you do of course have the choice ignore the standards and to accept a lower level of protection if you wish.
you've also got the choice to not waste money on electronics packaging, and do your normal, everyday activity in normal, everday clothes.:biggrin:

with beer inside you, if you choose:thumbsup:
 
kyuss said:
Non-Snell certified helmets don't necessarily have less protection. Snell certification is an independent test that has to be paid for and a lot of manufacturers don't bother, relying on their own in-house testing procedures and local government/transport/safety certification. Just because a helmet isn't Snell certified doesn't mean it failed the test and is less safe, just that it didn't take the test in the first place.

I'd imagine any mid to high end helmet from the likes of Giro, Met etc are tested just as rigorously as any Snell certified helmet is.
That's fine - I could also imagine that they don't necessarily

The Trek Anthem C(Elite) is a classic, the full certification of CPSC in the states of the prototypes and manafacturer provided samples. Then when checked independently by the US Consumer Reports organisation it failed the impact tests and had to be withdrawn!

I would also have thought that if you had proof that a helmet withstood twice the impact in some tests then chances are it would be safer,equally testing with anvils that simulate kerbs are more likely to give confidence in the ability to resist such an impact.

But then again I have to admire your faith in the integrity and honesty of the US corporate system.
 
OP
J

jimbut

Well-Known Member
Jesus, what have I started here ! I was just hoping to hear from owners of the Ionos and new Prolight ( both Giro ) for some "real use" feedback. If you think of the position your body is in on the bike, the lighter the weight sitting on your noggin the better ( obviously the helmet also has to be able to do its job ).
 
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