How much of a difference is going from shimano claris to ultegra gear set?

OP
oreo_muncher

oreo_muncher

Senior Member
If you can do your route at say 20kmh - go out and attack certain parts of it as fast as you can. Then recover for a bit and go again.

If you do this you stress your system and it adapts to cope with the pace. You will get faster.
There's this portion where there are 3 massive hills in a row, very steep and I do manage to cycle up them but they reduce my average speed. And then a few times I have to stop because there is a junction and I rather just stop and check then get run over by accident. And I go through about 6 sets of lights on that route.. Which all contribute to a decreased average speed. I guess I could try going faster on the flat portions of the ride. The route is 1000feet and 45km.
 
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oreo_muncher

oreo_muncher

Senior Member
I change the route of my lunch time ride (the overall elevation/time/distance is about the same though) but looking at them in the summer for the same effort or less (recorded on a power meter) I was approximately 2kph faster than I am now late autumn. Theoretically removing the Autumn/Winter elements I am still riding at the same speed now. But if you've managed to maintain you are riding at the same speed, taking out those elements actually means you are potentially riding faster. Don't get hung up comparing current speed to summer speed though; if you must compare, compare summer to summer :okay:
The headwind has been quite bad the few times I've been out. So maybe I did improve a tiny bit if I'm still riding at the same speed as the summer. But I no longer cycle at the same frequency as in the summer where I was on my bike 5 times a week, now it is down to once a week 😞 I'm probably losing my fitness 😞
 
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oreo_muncher

oreo_muncher

Senior Member
likely no reason why you can’t fit a rack or sturdier wheels at least for light touring. You yourself weigh nothing so even with panniers you’re bike would be carrying much less weight than for many heavier cyclists
I know I could but then I'll miss the speediness of that bike, and would have to faff around going between touring mode and non touring mode.
 
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oreo_muncher

oreo_muncher

Senior Member
One of the best geartrains I found to live with was the old 2300 Sora. It needed to be set up on an absolute knife edge (not a problem if you know how to set up gears properly) or it could be clunky, but the thumb buttons for up changes were brilliant and much nicer to use when on the hoods, which is fantastic on real roads with real traffic and a real need to turn your head occasionally.

And my absolute favourite was the 10 speed Tiagra, I've got big hands (take note ladies ;) ) so the longer lever throw felt much more natural to me. For all the fancy mech geometry and fluorine coated pivots, none of the higher ranked gear trains suited me so well,

Some depleted uranium and platinum Dura Ace looks absolitely lovely, but brings nothing to the party that helps me personally. You're just going to have to ride and ride and ride, get those miles under your belt on as many different bikes as you can and you'll soon figure out what it crap, what looks great, what costs a lot, and what actuslly gives a tangible benefit. The sweet spot is different for everyone, and time in the saddle is the only way you'll figure out where yours is.

And remember your grammar. What most people call a groupset is nothing of the sort - they mean a geartrain, and possibly brakes thrown in too. A groupset will include cables, skewers, seatpin, and even wheels, pedals and handlebars on some, so when people refer to a groupset they usually mean anything but. Stupid testers in glossy magazines are responsible for promulgating this rubbish.
I just need to find a way to sneak in a new bike so my Mum wouldn't know I got a 2nd bike:shy:She gets annoyed about having to store my current bike and about my bike spending, not sure how bike number 2 would go down with her. And I need to save up to get the one I want next. I think I want another trek, the emonda range is meant to be ultra light, madone is meant to be more aerodynamic and the domane is about comfort and endurance. I was just thinking about just getting a better domane. I used to think about getting an Orbea bike but hard to find a place in the UK that sells them and I don't want to be buying it online. And I don't know if i would even enjoy riding an orbea.
 
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OP
oreo_muncher

oreo_muncher

Senior Member
Sigma in Kingston now sell Orbea
https://www.sigmasports.com/bikes/road-bikes?manufacturer_name[]=orbea&sort=popularity&p=1
However, perhaps you should listen to your mum as you’ve said elsewhere money is tight.
Maybe save up and treat yourself when you graduate :okay:
The blue/black one is really nice: https://www.sigmasports.com/item/Orbea/Avant-M20-Team-Disc-Road-Bike-2020/Q528
I'm saving up, I want my 2nd bike to be more on the expensive side :shy:, buy once but buy proper?
 

MrGrumpy

Huge Member
Location
Fly Fifer
I have a shimano claris gear set- trek al2 domane bike and I'm wondering how much of a difference would it be if I had a bike with an ultegra gear set? Would I be more faster?
upgrade your wheels if you want to notice a difference:okay:
 

SkipdiverJohn

Veteran
Location
London
Not a fan of road bikes?
There's road bikes and there's ugly road bikes. Most modern ones with disc brakes and those horrible tumour shaped brifters fall into the latter category. There's probably only two things that @vickster and I would ever both agree on - and that is that matt black bikes look dull and boring and Shimano hydraulic brifters are really pig ugly.
You're barking up the wrong tree anyway if you think buying a much more expensive bike is going to make any meaningful difference to how fast you can go. It really isn't; any such gains are going to be tiny. and will get lost in the normal variables of air density and wind direction on any given ride.
 
OP
oreo_muncher

oreo_muncher

Senior Member
upgrade your wheels if you want to notice a difference:okay:
Upgrade them to what? How much of a difference would it make? And what's the cost? My current bontrager tyres have been serving me well - 1000s of km and no puncture (hope I don't jinx myself here).
 

vickster

Legendary Member
Upgrade them to what? How much of a difference would it make? And what's the cost? My current bontrager tyres have been serving me well - 1000s of km and no puncture (hope I don't jinx myself here).
They will wear out though, you’ll know when as you’ll start to get punctures ;)
 
OP
oreo_muncher

oreo_muncher

Senior Member
There's road bikes and there's ugly road bikes. Most modern ones with disc brakes and those horrible tumour shaped brifters fall into the latter category. There's probably only two things that @vickster and I would ever both agree on - and that is that matt black bikes look dull and boring and Shimano hydraulic brifters are really pig ugly.
You're barking up the wrong tree anyway if you think buying a much more expensive bike is going to make any meaningful difference to how fast you can go. It really isn't; any such gains are going to be tiny. and will get lost in the normal variables of air density and wind direction on any given ride.
I don't want an expensive bike to be faster. I want a more enjoyable ride. A more smooth ride. And because why not?
 
OP
oreo_muncher

oreo_muncher

Senior Member
They will wear out though, you’ll know when as you’ll start to get punctures ;)
When do you think that will happen? I'm dreading that day. I have the tools incase it happens with me when I go on my bike but if it happened - I don't know if i could do it. I've watched all the YouTube videos and know the theory but don't have the practice.
 
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