How often do you need rescuing?

How often do you need to be rescued from a mechanical on average?

  • once in every 100 miles

    Votes: 1 1.0%
  • once in every 1,000 miles

    Votes: 2 2.0%
  • once in every 10,000 miles

    Votes: 14 14.3%
  • once in every 100,000 miles

    Votes: 19 19.4%
  • less often or never been rescued

    Votes: 62 63.3%

  • Total voters
    98
From discussions elsewhere, it seems the need to be rescued from mechanical breakdowns is a thing.

I'm intrigued to know how often this happens.

"Rescued" means needing assistance to get home/other destination, be it cab, lift, train, RAC, army lorry, whatever.

It doesn't include having your bike fixed by a companion or passer by.

Outrageous anecdotes about being carried on the back of an escaped tiger, pictures of completely totalled frames etc are encouraged.
 

Threevok

This space available to rent
Location
South Wales
I've never been rescued

I once rode 2 miles home, with a broken right Calcaneus and fractured left Radius
 

T4tomo

Veteran
You'd think you'd need a 1 in 10 miles from some of the hysteria on he other thread.
I'm a never.....

I once snapped a chain on a MTB without having my chain tool with me, short scoot / freewheel and 1/4 mile push up the hill home.

I've managed to snap twice (and repair once) in 5 mins a chain on my own driveway - I got another bike out and ordered a new chain on the 2nd snap. it was first outing on that (summer) bike not sure what had happened over winter?

I also got a puncture on a hotel hire bike before I'd got past the swimming pool much to the amusement of my mates, I also punctured about half way round) and got called a fat knacker for the rest of the ride. At least the hire shop replaced the first tube and I did the 2nd whilst being encouraged to "hurry up fatty".
 

Dogtrousers

Kilometre nibbler
Best anecdote was sometime in the 80s. I was in Pembrokeshire and my chain broke - entirely my own fault as this was in the days of closing chains by using great subtle riveting skill. I have zero skill of any kind so naturally my chain separated. I walked some way to a farmhouse asking to borrow some tools (hammer and punch). He was just leaving for town and I rode on a trailer behind his tractor, drinking a cup of tea that he'd provided, through the beautiful Pembrokeshire countryside. A better way to travel than cycling, I'd say. When I can afford to pay a tractor-driving chauffeur I'll go touring this way.

I have a few anecdotes not requiring rescue. My touring mate broke his pedal crank. He half-pedalled and I pushed him for an hour or so to a town with a bike shop. (May have been Grantham ... memory is hazy). About 10 months ago I hit a pothole and destroyed my front wheel. But no rescue required as I was a mere miserable trudge to the nearest railway station. So I miserably trudged. Half carrying the bike because the front wheel woudn't rotate.

Riding up Birling Hill a couple of years ago I saw a guy at the roadside. I stopped to see if he needed help (not because I was knackered and needed a breather. That wasn't why I stopped at all. No.) He too had a snapped crank, so I had nothing in my bag of tricks to help him - apart from a roll of Duck tape. I guess he needed rescue.
 

Domus

Veteran
Location
Sunny Radcliffe
My first ever puncture, quite soon after starting to ride. It was mid December in Newby Bridge. I got the tyre off, found the thorn but struggled for almost 30 minutes to get the tyre back on, my hands were frozen and resorted to using a lever and managed to snake bite the new tube. :cursing:.
A passing cyclist asked if I was ok and rode off when I said no. :cursing:. Rang Mrs Domus in Grange who came to the rescue. Four years on my tyre changing technique has improved as have my choice of tyre.
 
OP
R

roubaixtuesday

Veteran
As stated elsewhere, this has only happened to me once - got a puncture when I'd forgotten to switch my saddlebag with tools and tubes to that day's bike.

The lovely Mrs Tuesday came to my rescue by driving to drop it off with me, which I think counts as a rescue, though I completed the ride.

I carry a pump, multitool incl chain splitter, quick link, two tubes, puncture repair kit and spare cables. Every bike has these permanently on it (learning from above!).

Whilst I certainly can conceive of failures which need rescue, I think they're vanishingly rare.

My learning over the years:
(1) check your tyres and replace if worn - tyre failure is the closest I've got to being stranded, having limped home on half inflated tyres a couple of times. I'm still poor at this.
(2) Take a puncture repair kit - multiple tube failures aren't uncommon, as are new or repaired tubes that turn out to be holed (though I've never actually had more than two failures on a ride)
(3) Chain failure is worth mitigating - snapped one once and was lucky the multitool happened to have a splitter. Now make sure they always do.
(4) Cable failures are relatively common if you're as lazy as me on routine replacement (though don't require a rescue)
(5) You can do a loaded tour with a failed frame (snapped at the "ears" at the top of the seat stays)
 

BoldonLad

Veteran
Location
South Tyneside
From discussions elsewhere, it seems the need to be rescued from mechanical breakdowns is a thing.

I'm intrigued to know how often this happens.

"Rescued" means needing assistance to get home/other destination, be it cab, lift, train, RAC, army lorry, whatever.

It doesn't include having your bike fixed by a companion or passer by.

Outrageous anecdotes about being carried on the back of an escaped tiger, pictures of completely totalled frames etc are encouraged.
I did, in the "other place" give an example of a rescue, but, on another occasion, Mrs @BoldonLad rode home from Durham City (19 miles) with one pedal, due to a "mechanical". It was about 20 years ago, so, she was only 54 then. :smile:
 

glasgowcyclist

Charming but somewhat feckless
Location
Scotland
Once in 50-odd years and only because I'd left a vital tool at home. Got the bike into one of those big black Peugeot van taxis, about 3 years ago.
 

Dogtrousers

Kilometre nibbler
No, he asked, "Are you OK?" I replied "No, I'm struggling". And off he went. :wacko:
Sorry, but I still find it funny. I know I shouldn't.

Either he was outrageously evil, or there was a miscommunication. Otherwise why would he have asked? I suppose it's the outrageous evilness that I find funny.

I've remembered another time. Back wheel pringled. As I picked myself up from the road a guy in a Range Rover pulled up. It turned out he was on his way to help his sister move house very near to where I live, and offered me a lift. Rescue not really necessary as I was only a few miles away from a railway station so I could have walked but kind offer graciously accepted.
 
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lejogger

Veteran
Location
Wirral
Nope.

Broken spokes, broken chains, broken shifter, broken cleat, holes in tubes, holes in tyres... was also hit by cars twice on consecutive days, but made it home under my own steam.

Once, on my commute home in the dark and wet, I couldn't find some microscopic glass embedded in my tyre and used up 3 tubes before I admitted defeat and walked the final two or three miles in carbon soles with look cleats.

The broken cleat and spokes were both while on tours and did require finding bike shops in the nearest towns.
 
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