I always wave

Sharky

Veteran
Location
Kent
Normally I do, but when I cross with a group, I would wave to the leaders, but it can be a bit tedious waving to all the stragglers. So sometimes they get ignored.
 

MarkF

Legendary Member
Location
Yorkshire
Can't be bovvered, I've got a vintage scooter, so have you, so what? In giddy moments, I like to make strong eye contact to elicit a wave, then look away quickly when I get one.:okay:
 

Smudge

Über Member
Location
Somerset
I had motorhomes and camper vans for many years, i've always had a motorcycle and bicycles..... so you get to point of.... FFS enough of the waving, i dont know you people.
 

EltonFrog

Henceforth known as Mr Floppy
I always ignore other riders, don’t acknowledge them at all, though the other day I got caught out and I accidentally responded to another riders ‘good morning’ with a ‘hello’ . I didn’t meant to, it was a lapse of concentration.
 
Location
London
Wow. It's been a while but has yet to descend down the 'roadie looking down on others' route yet and the OP is a relative newbie so won't know that it's Cycle Chat bingo
So...the penny jar is empty
View attachment 504587
Do I wave? When I can be bothered.
Am I bothered if I don't get a wave back?
Hell no.
you've forgotten the northern/southern thing.

(and yes for folk's wondering - I often wave/nod/whatever if out in the country. Simple human pleasures. And needed now more than ever perhaps. I also often get the same from others first - maybe more up north though :smile: )
 
you've forgotten the northern/southern thing.
There's something in this.

I'm more inclined to wave when riding on my own patch, partly because if I wave at half the cyclists I see on a ride, I might only have to wave twice.

I attempted the same policy on a ride through Oxford, but soon got fed up with it because I was waving every few seconds.

Same with pedestrians on a shared path, in the north there are very few so I will tend to use my voice to alert them when approaching from behind.

Too many to do that down south.

Allied to that is the fact that northerners are more likely to speak to strangers.

I see that all the time, in shops, on public transport, in cafes, and on the bike.

Not sure if it makes northerners more friendly, just keener to acknowledge the existence of others.
 
Top Bottom