Kapp to Cape documentary, thoughts?

oreo_muncher

Senior Member
Did anyone watch the Kapp to Cape documentary? What did you guys think of it? Do you guys think you could beat the 102 day record for it? I just think what the guy did was crazy, especially with cycling through some dangerous areas and keeping going even with all his health problems. I don't understand why every time he wanted to sleep in a hotel and why he wouldn't just opt out for sleeping in his tent when he was cycling and falling asleep. I feel like if he planned it a bit better he could have avoided issues with food -I'm kind of thinking of a system similar to the 'bag drop zome' for the LEL, but there could be an issue with that, with a trip of such a big scale. A bit shocked that if he spent so much time planning it, then why did he not know of the gravel roads in Tanzania? Knowing he was cycling through places with malaria, I don't understand why he didn't plan ahead and take anti malarial tablets, he could have prevented getting malaria in the first place, didn't see him sleeping with a net either.
 
Channel?
 

steveindenmark

Legendary Member
Hindsight is easy if you have never done anything like this before.

I have not seen the documentary and dont know who the rider is. But 102 days is phenomenal. If this was a bona fide self supporting record attempt, I doubt if bag drops would be allowed. Most of the top ultra riders will choose to spend few hours in a hotel room than outside. They can shower, clean clothes, charge devices, get decent food, keep warm and dry and get a few quality hours sleep and a bit of normality. They dont carry tents most of the time but will carry a bivvy bag as their sleeping kit. You would think that he would know about the malaria problem in the areas he was riding through. Finding out road conditions in Africa when you are sat at home must be difficult and I am sure it is quite easy to get caught. Some roads may be rideable one day and a quagmire after rain the next day.

Who was the rider?
 
OP
oreo_muncher

oreo_muncher

Senior Member
Hindsight is easy if you have never done anything like this before.

I have not seen the documentary and dont know who the rider is. But 102 days is phenomenal. If this was a bona fide self supporting record attempt, I doubt if bag drops would be allowed. Most of the top ultra riders will choose to spend few hours in a hotel room than outside. They can shower, clean clothes, charge devices, get decent food, keep warm and dry and get a few quality hours sleep and a bit of normality. They dont carry tents most of the time but will carry a bivvy bag as their sleeping kit. You would think that he would know about the malaria problem in the areas he was riding through. Finding out road conditions in Africa when you are sat at home must be difficult and I am sure it is quite easy to get caught. Some roads may be rideable one day and a quagmire after rain the next day.

Who was the rider?
Reza Pakravan.

I understand if he wants to go to a hotel from time to time but when he was falling asleep on his bike and fell off it a couple of times, I think I would settle for the tent.

I do think what he has done was impressive, I'm not undervaluing his achievement!
 

matticus

Über Member
Hindsight is easy if you have never done anything like this before.

I have not seen the documentary and dont know who the rider is. But 102 days is phenomenal. If this was a bona fide self supporting record attempt, I doubt if bag drops would be allowed.
Even if it was allowed, imagine the logistics of drop bags on a 11,000 mile trip! :P
 

Ajax Bay

Veteran
Location
East Devon
I don't understand why every time he wanted to sleep in a hotel and why he wouldn't just opt out for sleeping in his tent when he was cycling and falling asleep.
I think it's great that this stuff interests you, and you share it, but had you considered actually riding your bike over a couple of nights with an element of distance/time challenge so you might better 'understand' why sleeping in a warm bed is attractive rather than sleeping under 'canvas' even if you're so tired - don't underestimate the motivation aspect: a clear destination and reward (shower and soft dry bed). Have you camped much? Have you tried to find a place to pitch a tent (in unfamiliar territory) and when v tired, pitch it? Have you slept in a bivvy bag overnight by the side of a road or in the middle of a strange town/city?
Besides the attractions of a bed 'inside' which @steveindenmark has listed, there are sockets in hotel rooms and power/energy management is a area the long distance rider needs to keep on top of, even with a dynamo.
 
OP
oreo_muncher

oreo_muncher

Senior Member
I think it's great that this stuff interests you, and you share it, but had you considered actually riding your bike over a couple of nights with an element of distance/time challenge so you might better 'understand' why sleeping in a warm bed is attractive rather than sleeping under 'canvas' even if you're so tired - don't underestimate the motivation aspect: a clear destination and reward (shower and soft dry bed). Have you camped much? Have you tried to find a place to pitch a tent (in unfamiliar territory) and when v tired, pitch it? Have you slept in a bivvy bag overnight by the side of a road or in the middle of a strange town/city?
Besides the attractions of a bed 'inside' which @steveindenmark has listed, there are sockets in hotel rooms and power/energy management is a area the long distance rider needs to keep on top of, even with a dynamo.
But at this point that I was talking about- he was cycling for less than a week- maybe 4 days? Better than him falling off the bike a couple of times..? Whilst I have no experience of camping or sleeping outside, it's just some thoughts I have, might be naive. And he did not have any stop point in mind to sleep in, he was in the middle of nowhere for miles! He did not have planned stops.
 

albal

Guru
Location
Dorset
Doesn't Jonas Diechman hold the record? He is currently swimming off the Adriatic as part of a world triathlon. Seems strange to do at this time.
 
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