MTB or Road Bike

johnnyb47

Veteran
Location
Wales
Hi.
I've been enjoying the old Mtb of late. Its heavy cumbersome and slow compared to my road bike, but saying that it does have alot of positives. Even though i ride alot slower i can still cover decent mileages in comfort. In fact i would say its more comfortable than the road bike. With the front suspension set hard, it still takes up the road buzz whilst not sapping to much energy away from me. The riding position also makes me feel safer out on the road. I've got mine fitted with Victoria Rubino pro slick tyres and even with them being a lardy 26x1.50 they roll very nicely indeed and grip supprisingly well.
Pot holes and general road conditions this time of year always keep me on my toes with the road bike.
You've only got to hit one nasty pot hole on 700c wheels and you could end up kissing the pavement. The fatter mtb wheels and suspension just seem to soak up anything that's thrown at it.
Also this time of year my cycling is mostly done in the dark.
Personally i hate cycling along busy A roads in the dark. I feel so much more vulnerable than in the summer months when its light.
For this reason i tend to dissappear down the quiter lanes in the winter, and a stronger mtb set up is better suited. After 45 miles of mud, floods and broken roads i came home today with a big grin on my dirty face. The bike is a rough and ready machine to which I'm not to fussy about it getting plastered in nature's worst unlike my road bike. A quick wash down and a wipe over with WD40 and it's good to go again.
One more point is that i find it's nice to change my riding habits throughout the year. In the summer its great to use the road bike and try and improve on my strava states. I can cycle further and faster and explore further places and when winter comes its always good to change over to the Mtb. Slower rides granted, but it does give me a chance to get off the beaten track and appreciate the local beauty of the country side.
This is what's good about cycling as a whole. It offers so many different angles to enjoy.
 

Slick

Guru
I do have a mountain bike, but it has road tyres on it. :okay:
 

steveindenmark

Legendary Member
For the first time ever, I have got a dedicated winter bike. It is also the first time I have owned a mtb.

Not only is it the cheapest of my bikes, it gives me the chance to take my other bikes off the road for an extended period of time for some TLC.

I am enjoying the 1x11 gearing and huge tyres.
496726
 
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DCBassman

Going up hills, very slowly...
I swap between the Scott roadie and the Trek mtb sort of randomly. I love the lightness and speed of the Scott, but really appreciate the comfort of the Trek, and its better climbing ability. I also like the big 1.95 City Jets on the Trek - the 25mm Luganos on the Scott feel like solid tyres after those!
 

Vantage

Carbon fibre... LMAO!!!
If you feel the 26 rolls over the bumps you need to try a 29er, even smoother still,
I once argued that 26" and 700c wheels roll exactly the same. Boy was I wrong! World of difference between my old 26" tourer and the current rig.
And on that small note, get a touring bike @johnnyb47. Mine does everything from rocky, muddy offroading to cruising along narrow twisty country lanes. Best bikes ever imo. :biggrin:
 

Drago

Flouncing Nobber
Location
Poshshire
Although when you need to change direction they arent so sharp, and when clagged with mud they weigh kilos more than smaller diameter 26ers would, slower to accelerate, and are more flexible, which is especially noticeable to heavy riders...no free lunch there. Mine is great on fast hardpack and glorious on sweeping trails, but on technical or muddy terrain it's a step backwards. I tend to still use the 26 when teaching for that reason.

In any case, his road bikes are also 29er, excepting any difference for the height of the tyre itself, so he'll be familiar with that already.

An intriguing thought though. Most of us had owned a Tarmac Terrorist, an old but decent quality rigid steel MTB stripped of unnecessary flab, shod with skinny road tyres and an inch off each end of the bars for squeezing through gaps between cars. They're hilarious fun and highly effective urban assault vehicles. Such a bike in 29 form might make an excellently entertaining device for such antics.
 
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DCBassman

Going up hills, very slowly...
Although when you need to change direction they arent so sharp, and when clagged with mud they weigh kilos more than smaller diameter 26ers would, slower to accelerate, and are more flexible, which is especially noticeable to heavy riders...no free lunch there. Mine is great on fast hardpack and glorious on sweeping trails, but on technical or muddy terrain it's a step backwards. I tend to still use the 26 when teaching for that reason.

In any case, his road bikes are also 29er, excepting any difference for the height of the tyre itself, so he'll be familiar with that already.

An intriguing thought though. Most of us had owned a Tarmac Terrorist, an old but decent quality rigid steel MTB stripped of unnecessary flab, shod with skinny road tyres and an inch off each end of the bars for squeezing through gaps between cars. They're hilarious fun and highly effective urban assault vehicles. Such a bike in 29 form might make an excellently entertaining device for such antics.
As I use both bikes only on road, it would still be a nice experiment!
 

Vantage

Carbon fibre... LMAO!!!
As I use both bikes only on road, it would still be a nice experiment!
You'd need to factor in things like frame geometry, materials etc.
My Spa Wayfarer, despite its capabilities is a rather sedate bike. Very stable and smooth but very much a bike for lazy Sunday cruising at a leisurely pace.
My old Dawes Vantage on the other hand was an absolute animal. It literally (OK not literally) screamed to be taken out and manhandled at every opportunity.
Both bikes were on 700c wheels.
 

cyberknight

As long as I breathe, I attack.
Over 10 miles my slicked mtb is about 4 mins slower , i use it when the roads are dodgy or its very cold as i have bar mitts on it .

It rolls well enough on the flat but as soon as you get on any incline the extra weight sucks your speed
circumference wise 622 x 25 =2096 mm 26x1.5= 2010 mm
 

Drago

Flouncing Nobber
Location
Poshshire
When I first started cycle commuting regularly I used a tarmac terrorist. A little slower on the straights, but a bit more nimble and upright once I hit the town traffic, great for kerb hopping. I was only 2 minutes or so slower across 9 miles than the road bike I later switched to. By God it was fun though!
 

fatjel

Veteran
Location
West Wales
I have an old 26er specialized hardrock which I've used a lot lately. It has mudguards , a rack and marathons, Perfect for a town dweller with no car. I doubt it's as quick as a road bike over a serious distance but doubt there is much in it, Once did a 100k aaa audax on a very similar bike and was surprised how easy it was.
 
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ColinJ

Puzzle game developer
For the first time ever, I have got a dedicated winter bike. It is also the first time I have owned a mtb.

Not only is it the cheapest of my bikes, it gives me the chance to take my other bikes off the road for an extended period of time for some TLC.

I am enjoying the 1x11 gearing and huge tyres.View attachment 496726
That mega-sprocket would be very handy here in hilly Yorkshire but isn't it way OTT in flat Denmark? I would have thought you are in the perfect country for a singlespeed mountain bike!
 
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