Orbea Gain

OP
youngoldbloke

youngoldbloke

The older I get, the faster I used to be ...
Puncture repair....
Has anyone replaced the rear axle with a QR skewer to enable them to repair/replace inner tubes on the back or do you repair the tube with the wheel in place? Or maybe you carry a small set of wheel spanners? Just curious what the standard repair equipment is these days.
8mm allen key is all you need. The wheel is HEAVY. The power cable must be disconnected before removing the wheel. Make sure you replace the wheel in exactly the same position as it was to enable you to reconnect the power cable correctly. See tech docs.
I also carry a lightweight 10mm (?) spanner to help orientate the spindle when it is replaced in the drop outs (you'll see what I mean when you do it :okay:) this spanner is not strictly necessary - I've taken the wheel off, fixed the puncture in the usual way (tyre off, inspected for cause, tyre back on, tube replaced, inflated and wheel refitted) using just the allen key.
 

Storck

Active Member
Location
UK
Andy, 8mm Allan for the rear and 6mm for the front wheel. Get a storage bottle. You can fit couple of tubes and levers in there and carry on the frame leaving pockets free.
 
OP
youngoldbloke

youngoldbloke

The older I get, the faster I used to be ...
Front wheel on the 2018 D30 (Tiagra) has a QR spindle. On mine I use a medium Topeak Aero Wedge saddlepack, for tools, spare tube/s puncture kit, pump etc - same as I used on my conventional bikes.
 

Big-Andy

Member
Location
Somerset
Thanks guys, great advice and help again. I will let you all know how I get on with my bike when it arrives at the end of the week. At least now I will have a clue as to what to take with me.
 

robgul

Guru
I think you'll find that the rear wheel is nutted, and has a special axle with "flats" on it make sure the motor locates in the drop-outs correctly and the cable connectors align. [I've only had the wheel out of mine to change the tyres when I first bought it]

So - yes a 15mm spanner will be required in the tool kit (you could get an "aero spanner" - i.e. a short stubby one)

Rob
 
OP
youngoldbloke

youngoldbloke

The older I get, the faster I used to be ...
I think you'll find that the rear wheel is nutted, and has a special axle with "flats" on it make sure the motor locates in the drop-outs correctly and the cable connectors align. [I've only had the wheel out of mine to change the tyres when I first bought it]

So - yes a 15mm spanner will be required in the tool kit (you could get an "aero spanner" - i.e. a short stubby one)

Rob
I think you'll find the 8mm allen key is sufficient. It's easier to remove the nuts and special washers completely to take the wheel off - don't lose them.
 

robgul

Guru
I think you'll find the 8mm allen key is sufficient. It's easier to remove the nuts and special washers completely to take the wheel off - don't lose them.
Ah - you could be right - I have a Park Tool CCW5C wrench with an 8mm Allen key in the bag on the bike for the rear wheel - must have a look at the wheel when I get the bike out for a ride this morning!
Rob
 

Scaleyback

Well-Known Member
Location
North Yorkshire
What tyres do you have on ?
I have Schwalbe G-One Allround tyres, 700 x 35c on front & 700 x 38c on rear.
These are a gravel tyres with a light tread. They roll great on roads but give the freedom to tackle tracks & paths. Never underestimate the comfort of larger tyres on our poorly maintained roads.
Schwalbe also do a version called G-One Speed, these are slick road tyres. I have used the 38c version (40 622) on another bike and these are brilliant fast comfortable tyres.
N:B despite appearances I have no connection to Schwalbe. ^_^
 
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OP
youngoldbloke

youngoldbloke

The older I get, the faster I used to be ...
Three punctures for me in just over 1500 miles. 28mm GP4000s. Only one true puncture - a thorn resulting in a slow deflation. The other two resulted from a badly factory-fitted rim tape. I couldn't understand why these punctures were on the rim side of the tube, until I discovered the tape edge was folded back on itself in places forming a sharp edge. Replaced with a new Schwalbe rim-tape and all is well.
 

Big-Andy

Member
Location
Somerset
I have Schwalbe G-One Allround tyres, 700 x 35c on front & 700 x 38c on rear.
These are a gravel tyres with a light tread. They roll great on roads but give the freedom to tackle tracks & paths. Never underestimate the comfort of larger tyres on our poorly maintained roads.
Schwalbe also do a version called G-One Speed, these are slick road tyres. I have used the 38c version (40 622) on another bike and these are brilliant fast comfortable tyres.
N:B despite appearances I have no connection to Schwalbe. ^_^
I asked the LBS if they would take off the Kenda OEM tyres and swap them for some Conti Contact plus City for me and they said it would be fine so I went for the 622-37c versions just to add a bit of comfort on the roads and paths. I don't fancy going too this on tyres yet as I need to shed a couple of stone first and then think about it.
 

Southernguns

Active Member
Location
Uk
Finally, after many infuriating delays, the Gain D30 has arrived :wahhey:- in matt black (with some damn awful light grey pedals that the shop put on - despite me asking for black! They will be going straight in the bin!). If my sciatica and hip pain will allow then I will try a short 10 mile ride today and see how it goes :cycle:.
 

Storck

Active Member
Location
UK
Finally, after many infuriating delays, the Gain D30 has arrived :wahhey:- in matt black (with some damn awful light grey pedals that the shop put on - despite me asking for black! They will be going straight in the bin!). If my sciatica and hip pain will allow then I will try a short 10 mile ride today and see how it goes :cycle:.
Hope you're up to it? Weather over the next few day's is looking favourable. Let's know your initial impressions?
 

Southernguns

Active Member
Location
Uk
Hope you're up to it? Weather over the next few day's is looking favourable. Let's know your initial impressions?
Thank you, Storck. I have not long returned and with positive results. I completed 13 miles which was pleasing considering this week is the first that I have been able to walk again in the last 8 weeks. Once on the bike pain was minimal and thankfully the battery enabled me to complete the ride while pushing but not overexerting myself. The gearing took me about 20 minutes to get used as it is geared completely differently to my Trek Emonda. I have Schwalbe G-One Gravel-Road all terrain 32mm tyres with inner tubes installed at present (thanks everyone for the advice on here). They seemed to run well on the road and on the small bit of gravel I did too. No real complaints but ideally, some road specific tyres would be better for my average speed etc, but at this stage that is not important - its all about getting out of the house and rebuilding my strength and fitness. Against some of the advice on here, but recommended by Storck (?), think, I may try tubeless as it is supposed to soften the ride a little. I would recommend these to Big-Andy. At 76kg (12.6ish stone) I am not light, nor heavy, but I feel these would cope well with more muscly, heavier or slightly overweight people (absolutely no offence intended - we are built and made differently and deal with varying influences that all affect our lifestyles. I am certainly in no position to judge). I also use flat pedals as my right foot goes outwards at a silly angle after the NHS put it back wrong when I broke it many years ago. I have never been brave enough to try clipless for fear of injury, so just accept the loss in power output.

I am pleased I went for the Medium size bike rather than the Orbea recommended (for my size) large . At 184cm (6'1"ish) it seems to fit perfectly. The large would definitely have been too big. I may swap in my carbon seat post to help soften the ride a little whilst my back recovers. I imagine the carbon models run a lot softer, or maybe my back is a little over sensitive at present. I managed to go up 2 (very short but steep) hills at between 11-13.5 mph on level 2 assist (orange). I am normally grinding my way up these at between 5 and 8 mph. When back to some reasonable level of fitness I would suspect that I would probably mainly use level 1 (green). I did use level 3 (red) for a third hill, which I normally struggle up, and would never have got up today on a non ebike. I had to work hard but managed to average 11mph whilst chasing the bus up it.

Below is an image of my stats using the ebikemotion app (no HR as my garmin HR strap does not seem to want to connect - probably the wrong type). I think the rpm cadence is way out. And I am not sure the elevation gain was quite that high, but I will need to check some old rides on my Garmin to confirm this. As you can see it is a fairly flat ride with a few short steep hills - the steepest at 26.8% for 100m (apparently!!! - according to the app at least, but I am not sure this is accurate).
upload_2019-5-30_15-59-50.png


I used 16% battery capacity, which I thought was rather high. I hope this will drop a little when there is less headwind and my fitness returns. I am really pleased with the quality and feel of the bike and the assistance levels (still currently set at 100% for each level) it provides. The motor comes in and drops out seamlessly and isn't really noticeable other than when pulling away from lights and junctions in levels 2 and 3, which is great for me at the moment as fast acceleration is too painful. I still had to work hard and i would guess that my hear rate was up around 150 - 160 for most of the ride, which is higher than normal for me, but 8 weeks of laying on my back has destroyed any fitness I had.

Thank you all your great advice as without this bike I would still be stuck in the house fighting boredom and watching tv. I owe you all a couple of beers - so if you are ever in Somerset... !
 

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