Preparing for my first FNRttC - Prep advice welcome

RoubaixCube

~Tribanese~
Location
London, UK
Im going to say that im being quite pedantic but i want my first ever ride with The Fridays to be one to remember in a nice way rather then a grueling 70 odd mile ride telling myself how much I hate life and myself because i left something at home.

Im compiling a checklist of things that need to be ticked off before i even leave the house on the night. Any input from seasoned/veteran FNRttC'ers very is much appreciated. everything should pack down into a Carradice Pendle saddlebag which has an 11ltr capacity. I also have an Deuter energy bag that will hold a few items as well, mainly a few sweets, gels and snacks etc etc.

Basics are basics -

Lights
P+ repair kit
spare chain links
multitool
two inner tubes
small first aid kit
Water - How much water do i leave the house with??? 2x750ml bottles?
Snacks/Gels: a few SIS gels, a banana or two and loads of mini Soreen loafs :hyper::hyper:
Considering getting a Co2 kit so i can leave the bike pump at home but even if i do have to carry my pump its quite a compact one anyway
Garmin Edge
GoPro
Compact Camera for snaps
Small powerbank to keep gopro charged.


Other things to consider -

Proper food - maybe a bacon sarnie or two!!
spare socks
extra layers,
some items of waterproof clothing
Helmet/Cap - One or the other or both


Id rather get everything prepared now so i have plenty of time to change a few things before the last minute.
 

slowmotion

Quite dreadful
Location
lost somewhere
My list has been...

Two tubes
Pump
Levers
Quick link
Lights and spare batteries for seven hours of darkness from the start

Phone with The Great Leader's phone number

One 0.75l water bottle with really weak lemonade and a teaspoon of salt. I never drink it all and you can fill up with water at the halfway stop.

A few fig rolls

Small cheap camera, rarely used

Waterproof jacket

Two buffs

WARM GLOVES AND SOCKS! (Good for morale)

Keys and cards

Cash for the halfway stop snacks and coffee

Breakfast beer money

That can all be fitted in a small wedge saddle bag and one of those containers that fit in a bottle cage. Personally, I really dislike riding with my jacket pockets stuffed with things because you tend to lose them while fumbling about in the dark. Also, it's uncomfortable.

You'll have fun, fear not. There are loads of good people who will come to the rescue if you have a mishap.
 
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srw

It's a bit more complicated than that...
Im going to say that im being quite pedantic but i want my first ever ride with The Fridays to be one to remember in a nice way rather then a grueling 70 odd mile ride telling myself how much I hate life and myself because i left something at home.

Im compiling a checklist of things that need to be ticked off before i even leave the house on the night. Any input from seasoned/veteran FNRttC'ers very is much appreciated. everything should pack down into a Carradice Pendle saddlebag which has an 11ltr capacity. I also have an Deuter energy bag that will hold a few items as well, mainly a few sweets, gels and snacks etc etc.
Basics are basics -

Lights the only essential
P+ repair kit don't bother - just take tubes and tyre levers
spare chain links - one is enough, and someone else will have one anyway
multitool
two inner tubes
small first aid kit - don't bother. SOmeone else will have one, and most injuries can either be fixed with soap and water at the half-way stop or, rarely, need an ambulance
Water - How much water do i leave the house with??? 2x750ml bottles? Yes, sounds about right
Snacks/Gels: a few SIS gels, a banana or two and loads of mini Soreen loafs - I wouldn't bother with the gels. A little bit of food would be helpful as you'll be standing around for a bit, but you don't need more than a little bit unless you're looking to make friends by handing it round.
Considering getting a Co2 kit so i can leave the bike pump at home but even if i do have to carry my pump its quite a compact one anyway - Someone else will have one.
Garmin Edge - up to you
GoPro - not worth it. Picture quality in the dark is shoot.
Compact Camera for snaps - up to you. THere are enough other people with decent cameras that you probably don't need to bother
Small powerbank to keep gopro charged. - see under GoPro


Other things to consider -

Proper food - maybe a bacon sarnie or two!! - I wouldn't bother. Depending on which ride it is the halfway stop will serve you well enough.

The rest is the important bit. Stay warm and dry and everything else can be managed.

spare socks
extra layers,
some items of waterproof clothing
Helmet/Cap - One or the other or both

The key is to have lots of layers. Assuming we're talking a London ride, the first couple of hours will be quite slow and there will be lots of standing around, so you'll want to be warm. The coldest bit is just after the half-way stop, when your body wants to be asleep and you've spent an hour or so sitting still, so your insides are very cold. You want to reserve something (possibly the waterproofs) to add after that. The waterproofs are very important unless you've got an absolute guarantee of a dry night - cold and wet is utterly grim.

For me, a buff, full gloves, leg-warmers and arm-warmers and winter boots are the best foundation for much of the year. I've got arctic base layers (combination polyester and merino) which are a fantastic body foundation.

If there's a forecast of serious rain you'll want spare socks, spare gloves, spare buff, spare everything. Some people change completely at half-way on a wet ride - it's worth considering. Personally I like taking lightweight civvies to change into at the end - because I don't like travelling home in smelly shorts.

 

Dogtrousers

Kilometre nibbler
Nothing much to add over the excellent advice above, just a couple of points:

Check your tyres to see if there are any bits of flint or similar stuck in them to reduce risk of puncture.
If your lights are rechargeable, don't forget to recharge them in good time to avoid last minute faff. If you have anything (lights, GPS etc) that takes batteries then take along some spares, and if they are rechargeable, take charged up ones not flat ones (no one would be so daft would they ... would they? ;) )
Test ride your lighting setup if it's a new combination (new light, old light on different bike) to make sure that the mounts are sound and don't shake loose.
Some small denomination money for the half way stop. You don't want to be paying for your cake and tea with a £20 note.

Enjoy!
 

ianrauk

Tattooed Beat Messiah
Don't dump the pump even if you have C02. Take both. You never know when you may need both.

As for gels, forget it, not needed. The FNR is not a fast, all out speedy sportive. 2 Soreen loaves? Well that SHOULD BE enough to give a slice to everyone on the ride.
As Simon used to say.. No one's ever starved on a FNR.

Unless you are a thirsty sort, 2 x750 bottles is overkill. It's a few hours to the half way stop then another few to the end. Will you gulp down 1.5L of fluid in that time?
 
Minimum, pump, two tubes, multi tool, lights.
To that, water bottle or two if it is going to be warm, clueless patches, spare link, dry gloves, socks, buff, third tube.
If wet is anticipated, overshoes, more dry gloves.
Maximum, a whole set of dry clothes to change into.
Food is a personal issue, I find that the food and drink at half time is usually sufficient. Others like to have stuff with them. Having said that, had I had some food with me on Saturday morning, that might have made the last few miles in to Whitstable easier.
I made a tactical food error when me and @StuAff did the Isle of Wight recce by only taking enough to 'get me round' a similar length day ride.

A mechanical messed up the schedule, and I was in quite severe need of food when a 24 hour Tesco hoved into view.

No need to take more than subsistence rations, but the quantity for a day ride may be insufficient for riding through the night.
 

StuAff

Silencing his legs regularly
Location
Portsmouth
On my first couple of FNRs, I brought far too much drink and ended up pouring most of it away. Even on a day ride, I'll usually only take 2 x 750ml bottles and have no need of a refill. On Friday night's run, I just about used one by halfway, I did refill that but hadn't finished the second bottle by the time I'd got home. For Shoreham, I'll ride back, weather permitting, and all I'll do is refill if need be. I'm a Soreen aficionado myself, but one full-size loaf in slices does me for the ride & journey back (whether I'm riding or on the train). I use gels myself, but not in preference to proper food- usually have two or three stashed ready if I feel the need for a quick energy hit. Did have one before the final sprint into Whitstable. Apart from that, I usually have a couple of bananas and cereal bars. There will be standing around. No need to carry too much food, the halfway won't run out...

On the lights, I always have two front lights, on the bike, and two rear (one stashed as spare), with spare batteries for the lot.The Edge should last the night on its own- I take an external pack for mine, but whether you feel the need or not will depend on the temperature (cold kills the battery life) and whether or not you're riding back.
 

redfalo

known as Olaf in real life
Location
Brexit Boomtown
Don't overthink it. You're talking about a FNRttC, which has a team of Tail End Charlies that can fix 99 percent of the mechanicals happening on such a ride; not about an Audax in the middle of nowhere, where you have to be fully self-sustained. It very rarely happens on a FNRttC that someone has to bail due to a broken bike. So two inner tubes, tyre levers and pump are what you need. A chain link can come in handy. CO2 is nice, but not necessary; and forget about the puncture repair set.

As for food, 750ml of liquid will be enough, provided you don't forget to refill the bottle at the half way stop. Forget about gels - you can get proper food at the half way stops. A couple of cereal bars, candy bars or a sandwich will see you through.

Enough clothes are most important. A good waterproof jacket is key - take it with you, no matter what the weather forecast says about rain. Several layers of cloths - I would highly recommend Merino stuff at least for base layers - are essential, and unless we're talking about a ride in the deep summer, take a spare layer or two. I tend to take spare gloves as well which can be a treat after the half-way stop, in particular if it had been raining.

On most rides (apart from summer one's with a bone-dry forecast) I also carry spare socks and a pair of Goretex socks. If my feet, socks and shoes get wet, I can change into dry socks and the Gore Tex socks after the rain has stopped. I don't bother with overshoes (they cannot prevent your feet from getting wet, just delay it) and only take waterproof overtrousers if forecast points to a lot of rain and a really cold night.

All in all: If you remember your first FNRttC as a nice night out or a gruelling 70 miles ordeal does not mainly hinge on the stuff you carry. Your personal level of fitness and your state of mind will be more important. I suffered a lot on my first FNRttC, but accepting the suffering and dealing with it is actually part of the challenge.
 
OP
RoubaixCube

RoubaixCube

~Tribanese~
Location
London, UK
Thanks to all for the helpful advice! It seems there are already a few small changes to my list that needs to be made.

I think 7-8hours will just fly by on the ride as youre out with a big group of people and its all the banter that keeps you in a good mental state and moving forward.
 
OP
RoubaixCube

RoubaixCube

~Tribanese~
Location
London, UK
One thing that's not been mentioned. You will need a lock. Maybe not a 5kg Sold Secure monster, but a lock of sorts.
What sort of locks do people carry? Only thing i can think of is a Kryptonite New York fahgettaboudit with a cable. but even then, that lock is about 2kg so ive heard.
 
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