Roubaix vs Alternatives?

Discussion in 'Bikes and Buying Advice - What Bike?' started by Huggis, 3 Mar 2018.

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  1. Huggis

    Huggis Active Member

    Hi everyone,

    Last year I built up a KTM Revaltor Sky(link is external) . It was meant to replace a 2006 S-Works Roubaix. However riding both back to back I find the Roubaix more comfortable and more responsive to pedal input.

    As such I'm now looking to transplant the KTM parts onto another 'endurance' carbon disc frame. Living where I do it is very hard to test any bikes. Instinct tells me to get a newer Roubaix frame, even the non S-Works frames seem to be of a higher grade of carbon (10r) than my old Roubaix (which was 9r) which , when combined with an improved design, should theortically be better.

    Any riders out there? Other bikes on the shortlist are Domane SLR, Bianchi Infinito CV and Synapse Hi-Mod.
     
  2. cosmicbike

    cosmicbike Perhaps This One..... Moderator

    Location:
    Egham
    I have a Roubaix, bought as it was billed as the most comfy. In fairness it is quite nice, but I test rode a Domane which took more of the road buzz away, so if I were buying again I'd be looking for one of them. I steered away after reading of issues with the 90mm BB they have in the carbon frames coming loose..
     
  3. OP
    OP
    Huggis

    Huggis Active Member

    Thanks that’s interesting feedback..yes I noticed the comments on the trek B.B. also..
     
  4. Oldbloke

    Oldbloke Guru

    Location:
    Mayenne, France
    I've got a 2017 Roubaix Comp, brilliant bike. Had a 2012 Roubaix SL3 previously, also excellent.

    The newer one feels much more responsive, rides like a Tarmac but IMO more comfortable.

    My only beef with it is a slightly noisy Futureshock, which Specialized will sort out.
     
  5. MasterDabber

    MasterDabber Well-Known Member

    I got a 2018 Roubaix Comp a few weeks ago. Given the crap weather I've only done about 450 miles on it but just love it. Quite a departure from my normal (best bike) ride, a Wilier Cento Uno SR and on rapidly disappearing road surfaces around here it makes things so much more comfortable. Handling is excellent.
    Hard to tell about overall speed at this time of year but seems pretty good. Not sure how it will compare once I get it on some longer climbs but hope to do that in a few weeks when I get back to France.
     
  6. OP
    OP
    Huggis

    Huggis Active Member

    Hmm bit worried about the comments on the noisy shock. That would drive me nuts!
     
  7. Oldbloke

    Oldbloke Guru

    Location:
    Mayenne, France
    It's a known fault on some early models, mine is being swapped for a new unit.
     
  8. OP
    OP
    Huggis

    Huggis Active Member

    Ok ..I’m probably getting one second hand..I wonder if there is any way to tell whether the newer version is fitted by looking.
     
  9. Oldbloke

    Oldbloke Guru

    Location:
    Mayenne, France
    You could try compressing the unit by hand to check if it operates quietly & smoothly, other than that the only thing I'd suggest is getting a Specialized dealer to check it.
     
  10. Paul_Smith SRCC

    Paul_Smith SRCC Veteran

    Location:
    Surrey
    All those deserve to be on the shortlist; all are aimed at the same style of riding experience, often categorised as 'Sportive' or 'Endurance' bikes. Although all are aimed at the same style of cycling there will be differences, Trek have the Iso Speed Fit and Specialized have there Zertz inserts and Future Shock for example, features that many do actually notice when they are doing their research when comparing each.

    Another extremely valid consideration is how the 'bike fit' will differ. But, often the data listed confuses many as to how the bike will not only ride, but fit them. When comparing focus on the frame 'stack' and 'reach', they will be listed for each and will influence bike fit. In effect they are trying to show you how high the bars will be and how far you have to reach for them. Due to the potential stem length and angle options, plus spacer variations, they understandably don't reference them, so they list the frame stack and reach instead; the 591 and 377mm as shown on the diagram below.


    Each model differs, I've looked them up for you.

    56cm.jpg
    To compare for this post I've used my size for each, Bianchi do not list a 56cm so I've used their 55 and 57cm. It's quite easy to look up the geometry charts for your personal size, I found those numbers listed via the following for the Domane, Roubaix, Synapse, Infinitio respectively. In your case if you are buying second hand with care you should be able to find a geometry chart for the model year.
     
    Last edited: 5 Mar 2018
    Huggis and SpokeyDokey like this.
  11. Elybazza61

    Elybazza61 Veteran

    Just need a good quality bb in there;had no problems with a Wheels manufacturing one (although it was a two-part affair) and the current C-Bear ceramic one which replaced it.
     
    cosmicbike likes this.
  12. cosmicbike

    cosmicbike Perhaps This One..... Moderator

    Location:
    Egham
    Great. Now I feel I should start looking for one:rolleyes:
     
  13. vickster

    vickster Legendary Member

    You may prefer titanium... ;)
     
    cosmicbike likes this.
  14. OP
    OP
    Huggis

    Huggis Active Member

    Thanks very useful to see the sizing presented like this.
     
  15. cosmicbike

    cosmicbike Perhaps This One..... Moderator

    Location:
    Egham
    Waiting for you to get bored with it:smile:
     
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