The bakers' thread

Discussion in 'CycleChat Cafe' started by glasgowcyclist, 19 Dec 2017.

  1. Asa Post

    Asa Post Small lungs, weak legs

    Location:
    Sheffield
    Not just a pretty face, are you? :okay:
     
    Reynard likes this.
  2. Reynard

    Reynard Veteran

    Location:
    Cambridgeshire, UK
    I have my moments :biggrin:
     
  3. benb

    benb Evidence based cyclist

    Location:
    Epsom
    Perfect, thanks.
    Yes, using a tin at the moment - might try one not in a tin some time soon.
     
  4. OP
    OP
    glasgowcyclist

    glasgowcyclist Charming but somewhat feckless

    Location:
    Scotland
  5. benb

    benb Evidence based cyclist

    Location:
    Epsom
    Thanks. I get so annoyed with recipes in cups, and oven temperatures in F.
     
  6. Dave7

    Dave7 Guru

    Location:
    Cheshire
    I am sure its been said several time (probably by me :blush:) but I prefer to use a bread maker/machine thingy. Throw the ingredients in, choose the setting & loaf size, press the start button and 3 hours later I have a nice loaf.
    The only times I have problems is when I allow some of the ingredients to get 'too old'.
    I am sure your artisan loafs are better but I am not a good chef and the machine is (mostly) fool proof.
     
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  7. OP
    OP
    glasgowcyclist

    glasgowcyclist Charming but somewhat feckless

    Location:
    Scotland
    Nowt wrong with the machine, I've still got mine and it turns out a bloody good loaf.

    There are two things about doing it freehand that I prefer and those are; I can vary my loaf ingredients and styles more, and my bread doesn't have that annoying void in the bottom where the kneading paddle sits.

    Actually there's a further reason and that is the buzz I get from making a successful loaf by hand; it's therapeutic and uplifting, particularly if other stuff has got me down during the week. I can't wait for Sundays!
     
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  8. benb

    benb Evidence based cyclist

    Location:
    Epsom
    Nothing wrong with using a bread machine, but there are 2 annoyances which make it preferable to bake bread "properly" for me:
    1. As @glasgowcyclist says, with a machine you get a hollow where the blade was. Or worse, on mine, it would frequently come out of the tin and stay stuck in the bottom of the loaf and I'd have to dig it out with a knife.
    2. Because you only get heat on 5 of the 6 sides, you don't get as nice a crust.

    Maybe those are both issues with the machine I was using, but as I can knead the dough in my mixer, which is the hardest part, there isn't an advantage to using a machine for me.
     
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  9. Reynard

    Reynard Veteran

    Location:
    Cambridgeshire, UK
    Nothing wrong with a bread maker - not everyone has the time or inclination to do bread by hand. Agree with what @glasgowcyclist says, though, especially about the buzz of getting a superbly turned out loaf.

    FWIW, I don't have a bread maker.
     
  10. Poacher

    Poacher Gravitationally challenged member

    Location:
    Nottingham
    Panasonic bread maker for regular wholemeal loaves (usually 85% wholemeal, 15% white, sometimes with added linseed, pumpkin seeds, sunflower hearts depending on mood).
    When Mrs Poacher wants a rustic French style loaf, dough is made in bread maker with type 55 flour plus up to 15% wholemeal if she's not watching, but shaped by hand, proved on oven tray in a swing-bin bag, slashed, sprayed with hot water and cooked at 200° C for 30 minutes fan. Usually good results.
    I would knead by hand, but my arms are too weedy!
     
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  11. Reynard

    Reynard Veteran

    Location:
    Cambridgeshire, UK
    There are some really good "in the bowl" kneading techniques that don't require serious elbow grease. It's more like a folding process that develops the dough.

    I do this rather than a "traditional" knead as only having a galley kitchen, it minimizes the mess.
     
    C R and Poacher like this.
  12. OldShep

    OldShep Active Member

    Surely a third one.. great fir getting the hands clean ^_^
     
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  13. OP
    OP
    glasgowcyclist

    glasgowcyclist Charming but somewhat feckless

    Location:
    Scotland
    Me too!

    Once I've mixed the ingredients I cover the bowl and leave it for ten minutes. Then I fold the dough in the bowl, repeating after 15 minutes and once again after 30 minutes. The fold I use was shown to me by a local baker and is the easiest thing.

    Wet your hands (this makes it much easier to handle the dough without getting messy) and slip them under the dough at 3 o'clock and 9 o'clock.
    Pick up the dough and let its own weight stretch it out a little.
    Flop it back into the bowl on its side.
    Turn the bowl 90 degrees and repeat.
    Do this about 6 times before leaving it to rest.
    Go through these steps again after 15 and 30 minutes.
    Leave it to rest for 30 minutes after the final fold then shape as desired.

    Once it has sufficiently proved, bake.
     
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  14. C R

    C R Über Member

    Location:
    Worcester
    I use a bread maker on the dough program to mix, knead and rise. I then pour the dough, knock back, "shape", and bake after leting it prove again.

    This was today's bake

    IMG_20190207_165339913.jpg IMG_20190207_165347282.jpg

    White with poppy, pumpkin and sunflower seeds.
     
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  15. benb

    benb Evidence based cyclist

    Location:
    Epsom
    Yesterday's attempt was better. Flavour is nice, but lacking something I can't quite put my finger on. Maybe a little sugar in the recipe is in order.

    IMG_20190207_192703.jpg IMG_20190207_192952.jpg IMG_20190208_081952.jpg
     
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