Trailside puncture repairs - any tips?

ChrisEyles

Veteran
Location
Devon
I had my first proper middle-of-nowhere flat in a long time today. Changing a tube in the field seems a lot more fiddly than in the garage - I always seem to need a third and fourth hand and worry about picking up grit on the tyre/tube. This time I came very close to popping the tube, since the tyre hadn't properly seated when I started to pump it up and the tube was peeking through the rim. Don't know how I missed that but like I said silly mistakes seem to creep in where they wouldn't fixing it at home at leisure.

Didn't find the source of the puncture either, so I have a nasty feeling the new tube will be flat when I check the bike tomorrow... we'll see!

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Anyone got any good tips to make life easier for trailside repairs?
 
Location
Loch side.
Practice, be prepared and keep good stock.
 
OP
ChrisEyles

ChrisEyles

Veteran
Location
Devon
Well, two out of three ain't bad. After once getting caught twenty miles from home on an Easter weekend with minimal public transport and no car to call on, I never go any distance from home without a full set of tools, puncture repair kit and usually a spare tube too. Get plenty of practice fixing tubes at home, which I guess makes life easier than if I didn't, but have been lucky enough to avoid it on the road/trail side for a long time now.
 
Check twice, pump once. Turn the tyre inside out, if there is anything left in the tyre it will be immediately obvious. Check the rim, the rim tape, the valve hole. Check everything again once the tube is in. Then put a few psi in the tyre, and press the tube upwards by the valve, to make sure it's in the tyre properly, and that the bead is seated properly. Then, and only then, fully inflate the tyre.
 

NorthernDave

Never used Über Member
Practice is the only way unfortunately - and it's a lot easier to practice a few times at home than at the roadside :smile:

Plus I carry 2 spare tubes and a pack of Scabs, just in case I'm really unlucky!
And 3 tyre levers, a mini-pump and CO2 inflator (with a spare cylinder) and a pair of cheap latex gloves.
 

screenman

Legendary Member
I am with NorthernDave on this one, everyone of my bikes are hanging with ready to go fully equiped with the list of things he mentioned.

I have said many times on here to practise at home at least 10 times, the last couple in a dark are with somebody kind chucking buckets of cold water over you.
 

screenman

Legendary Member
A piece of folded toilet roll, wipe it round the inside of the tyre, will snag on even the tiniest thorn.
I use mutton cloth.
 
OP
ChrisEyles

ChrisEyles

Veteran
Location
Devon
@User46386 yes I would probably struggle doing this at night!

I like the idea of a bit of cloth/tissue to snag any thorns, since they can be quite hard to find if they are only just poking through the tyre.
 

Levo-Lon

Guru
I just invested in a co2 kit..hope I don't need it but it should save time on a ride to work flat..or mtb middle of nowhere job.
All of the above tips..practice and being thorough on the checking is a good practice.
 

Glow worm

Guru
Location
Near Newmarket
Check your patch glue hasn't solidified. I found mine had recently - luckily only during a routine check not a puncture. It must have been years old as I always carry a spare tube, and have not had a visit for a while thanks to the good Mr Schwalbe Marathon Plus.
Latex gloves are a good call though I tend to use wet wipes. Although I use Presta valves I carry a pump attachment for Schrader valves too in case I meet any stranded brothers/ sisters out on the road.
 
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