Tubeles Road Tyres

Venod

Eh up
Location
Yorkshire
I have seen a lot about tubeless road tyres recently, I think Steve Abrham is using them on his record breaking attempt, has anybody experienced them yet. I have successfully run tubeless on MTB for a number of years and I am considering giving them a go on the road using existing rims (H plus son archetype) or if the advantage is great I could be tempted to build some new wheels with Stans rims, but the higher pressures & speeds involved with road cycling are questioning the decision.
 
I only started cycling last August, but I changed to tubeless tyres on Stan's Grail rims in October and so far they've been entirely problem-free, as well as having saved me at least two punctures from hedge-cutting debris.I'm running 28mm tyres at 80 rear, 72.5 front - very comfortable and certainly have a better feel than the higher pressure, stiffer tubed tyres on the original wheels. They hold the pressure really well too: the most pressure loss I've seen was 10psi when not used (or checked) for two weeks. Oh - and fitting / inflating was easy with no tyre levers and a track pump to seat and inflate.
 
OP
OP
Venod

Venod

Eh up
Location
Yorkshire
I only started cycling last August, but I changed to tubeless tyres on Stan's Grail rims in October and so far they've been entirely problem-free, as well as having saved me at least two punctures from hedge-cutting debris.I'm running 28mm tyres at 80 rear, 72.5 front - very comfortable and certainly have a better feel than the higher pressure, stiffer tubed tyres on the original wheels. They hold the pressure really well too: the most pressure loss I've seen was 10psi when not used (or checked) for two weeks. Oh - and fitting / inflating was easy with no tyre levers and a track pump to seat and inflate.

Sounds good, what tyres are you running ?
 

shadow master

Well-Known Member
I hear good things about them,obviously spin up well due to weight etc...but I get so few punctures,one about every 1500 miles,I don't need to change really
 
If you do actually get a puncture, do you just have to push the bike home, or can they be fixed?
The rule with cars was you got rather fewer punctures, but if you got one, it was no longer a roadside patch. On cars, you have a spare wheel of course - at least you used to in the good old days, now you get a pram wheel if you're lucky (off topic now).

So can they be repaired by the roadside, or are you buggered?
 
You can just put a tube in. So, yes, that means you still need to carry a spare tube, plus tyre levers.That assumes it's not a huge gash in the tyre of course, but if a tubed tyre /could/ be fixed then, with the same damage to the tyre, a tubeless tyre can be too, with the application of a tube.
 
You can just put a tube in. So, yes, that means you still need to carry a spare tube, plus tyre levers.That assumes it's not a huge gash in the tyre of course, but if a tubed tyre /could/ be fixed then, with the same damage to the tyre, a tubeless tyre can be too, with the application of a tube.

doh ! of course. I forgot about the obvious answer.

Strictly speaking you're not supposed to do this with car tyres, though arguably OK for a bodge, but I'm sure it's fine for a bike, and presumably you can patch the tyre yourself when you get home - maybe even at the roadside.

If it's a huge gash - well you need some serious bodgery tubed or otherwise if you're to avoid the long push.

I'll think about it when my rims wear out.
 

screenman

Legendary Member
No! it is modern technology, pure trickery I tell you, I heard of a bloke who punctured with them on and the sealant completely covered him in slime and set instantly and turned him all white, because it was snowing at the time he was not found until the summer, he told me they were useless.

Not got them on a road bike yet, but will soon. Have had them on the MTB,s for a good while now.
 
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