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Whats your workshop look like?

Discussion in 'Vintage and Classic Bikes' started by woodbutcher, 12 Aug 2017.

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  1. raleighnut

    raleighnut Guru

    Location:
    On 3 Wheels
    I use a Japanese Water Stone which has a grinding action as opposed to an oilstone which 'moves' the metal on the edge leaving that 'feather' that you strop away

    Similar to a waterstone action, in that it gives a ground edge.
     
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  2. raleighnut

    raleighnut Guru

    Location:
    On 3 Wheels
    22.5 gives a reasonable 'life' to the edge, any more acute can be a bit 'fragile' but then with a 'waterstone' I'm not stoning to a secondary bevel (although I've got the option of doing that if I need to sharpen something in a rush to finish a job)
     
  3. slowmotion

    slowmotion Quite dreadful

    Location:
    lost somewhere
    A bit off-topic, but while the CC Massive is on the subject of marking tools, why do two of my rosewood squares only have a brass reference surface on the inside of the right angle? It would make it far more useful if it had a brass strip on the outside as well.
     
  4. Oldfentiger

    Oldfentiger Über Member

    Location:
    Pendle, Lancs
    Decent Myfords can cost silly money. I picked the Raglan up on EBay for a song, although it was a bit of an adventure getting it home. It's heavier than it looks!
     
  5. raleighnut

    raleighnut Guru

    Location:
    On 3 Wheels
    You never use a woodworking square to check internal angles, they are a marking tool only, in fact you'll find they need calibrating if they've been dropped as the blade isn't held that rigidly in the stock.

    To check em simply draw a line on a board then flip the square over and draw a 2nd line about a mil away, if those 2 lines aren't parallel then 'tap the end of the square's blade to adjust it.
     
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  6. slowmotion

    slowmotion Quite dreadful

    Location:
    lost somewhere
    Yebbut......wouldn't it be useful to be able to check internal angles on a workpiece?
     
  7. raleighnut

    raleighnut Guru

    Location:
    On 3 Wheels
    Use an 'engineers' square for that job but TBH measuring across corners is far more accurate.

    A funny tale,
    When I did my 'City & Guilds' which was a 2yr 'full time' course of about 35hrs a week (practical and theory) we were allowed into the workshop at any time when a lecturer was in there (and we weren't supposed to be somewhere else) and there was a bench 'free' I'd be in there (the college was open until about 8 at night for 'trade' classes) just practising cutting Dovetails on bits of wood then sawing those off the end and cutting another one to the point where I can saw a square end without needing a square to mark it.
    This led to quite an 'interesting' chat with the head of department ( a rather curmudgeonly fella called Leonard Ball who was a fantastic genuine Cabinetmaker) to ask why I was doing this, I just said "For practice" and he let me get on with it (with the occasional 'sarky'. comment) however I'd be in there just cutting all kinds of joints from 'halving' to mitres to dovetails for hours.

    When it came to 'exam' time and our work was marked Len told me my pieces were far and away the best he'd seen for a long time (the exam pieces were made in unusual timber, Sweet Chestnut had to be used for the 'Bible Box' with 'Secret Mitre Dovetails' for instance so that any mistakes which 'scrapped' a bit of timber resulted in a loss of marks)
    Len said to me "So all that time spent 'buggering' about wasn't wasted then" and I replied " I came here to learn how to do things, not just to get the certificate at the end of it". He shook my hand and told me he admired my attitude.
     
  8. slowmotion

    slowmotion Quite dreadful

    Location:
    lost somewhere
    Good stuff!
     
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  9. wonderdog

    wonderdog Well-Known Member

    Lovely precise work. I'm a firm believer that well maintained hand tools are much more preferable than a truckload of power kit. Good chisels, saws and planes can shift an awful lot of timber without having to fart around with jigs and other setups. Wouldn't mind a thicknesser tho'.
     
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  10. wonderdog

    wonderdog Well-Known Member

    Yes, a great way to tone up chisels, plane shooting surfaces and irons ... get down to 1000 fine with clove oil and you can polish the whole thing to a point where you can see your face (or the surviving half digit) in it. This all reminds me of a pal from the Australian National University school of art who built his own planes out of bronze sheet, dovetailing the soles to the sides. Tolerances??? What tolerances??
     
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  11. OP
    OP
    woodbutcher

    woodbutcher Über Member

    Location:
    S W France
    On the subject of tools l thought you guys might like to see the attached. To give you the background, when l was working in China l had a small team of Chinese woodworkers working with me to make pre production examples of the furniture so that we could iron out any unforeseen problems with construction etc. We became a very close knit group and they referred to me as "shifu" which roughly translates as master or father figure. Very flattering and a bit of a responsibility. These men were mostly uneducated in any formal sense but they were all highly intelligent and to give you an example, l once saw one of them studying the woodworkers pocket book which l had left lying about and although he had no comprehension of english he quickly got to grips with the section on geometry especially the methods of drawing an ellipse. To cut a very long story short, before l left, these guys presented me with this traditional tool which they make themselves. As you can see it is a sort of rebate plane made of wood into which they insert multiple blades which they make out of odds and ends of steel. When you get the hang of it, its very effective.
     

    Attached Files:

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  12. MikeG

    MikeG Veteran

    Location:
    Suffolk
    That looks as though you draw it towards yourself to cut, rather than push it away. Is that right? If so, there is a strong similarity with Japanese planing techniques.
     
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  13. Paulus

    Paulus Getting older by the minute

    Location:
    Barnet,
    Far too clean and tidy. Have you ever repaired anything in it?
     
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  14. Oldfentiger

    Oldfentiger Über Member

    Location:
    Pendle, Lancs
    Restorations of four classic trials bikes, three bicycles, one vintage lawnmower, numerous repairs for myself and neighbours are what comes to mind for now.
    Oh, and rebuilt and upgraded a pro kart, including both engines rebuilt.
    Several model rc aircraft built.
    As I said, it's not as clean and tidy nowadays.
     
  15. Paulus

    Paulus Getting older by the minute

    Location:
    Barnet,
    OK, my post was supposed to be a bit humorous, but it missed the mark.
     
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