Words that annoy me for no particular reason.

SpokeyDokey

64 and a little bit.
Moderator
You missed a bit off there

You mean the

'The utterly pompous 'egregious' JRM :cursing:'
Sorry Muddy that has gone right over the top of my old bonce.

As an aside, albeit related, Lovely Wife is keeping track of my 'duh' moments in 2021 - she's up to 4 already plus I've had 2 on CC that I have not reported to her.

Be gentle with me when explaining as I'm think I'm going to develop a complex of some description in the not too distant future.
 

mudsticks

Obviously an Aubergine
Sorry Muddy that has gone right over the top of my old bonce.

As an aside, albeit related, Lovely Wife is keeping track of my 'duh' moments in 2021 - she's up to 4 already plus I've had 2 on CC that I have not reported to her.

Be gentle with me when explaining as I'm think I'm going to develop a complex of some description in the not too distant future.

Sorry me ol mucker, but the only way to keep the brainium sharp is to keep using it.. :okay:

Anyway, I'm sure someone will be along in a mo, to put you out of your misery, no doubt :angel:
 

SpokeyDokey

64 and a little bit.
Moderator
Sorry me ol mucker, but the only way to keep the brainium sharp is to keep using it.. :okay:

Anyway, I'm sure someone will be along in a mo, to put you out of your misery, no doubt :angel:
:laugh:

Was it a reference to Jacob Rees Mogg, didn't he say something about an egregious act by the EU?

What a creep he is, just vile
Thank you. :okay:
 

RichardB

Slightly retro
Location
West Wales
Hmmn I wouldn't be so sure, maybe in terms of written English perhaps

But we are pretty good at hanging on to our accents, and regional language differences. Even on this crammed together, tiny island.

All around the UK there are people whose spoken English I struggle to grasp - even in the west country where I grew up.

Long may it continue.
Oh, I totally agree! However, the number of people speaking specific regional accents is diminishing, and this trend can only accelerate with the spread of US-dominated media. My Dad (1913-1988) could remember farmers in the Yorkshire Dales speaking different dialects in each dale, and people being able to place someone's birthplace to within a few miles just on the way they spoke. Now we are much more mobile, and most of us watch TV and go to the movies watch films, and that is no longer the case. My accent could now be described (and has been!) as 'vaguely Northern'. I'm Yorkshire born and bred, but I have moved around with work and had a lot of exposure to mass media, and I'm sure I am fairly typical.
 
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swee'pea99

Legendary Member
Oh, I totally agree! However, the number of people speaking specific regional accents is diminishing, and this trend can only accelerate with the spread of US-dominated media. My Dad (1913-1988) could remember farmers in the Yorkshire Dales speaking different dialects in each dale, and people being able to place someone's birthplace to within a few miles just on the way they spoke. Now we are much more mobile, and most of us watch TV and go to the movies watch films, and that is no longer the case. My accent could now be described (and has been!) as 'vaguely Northern'. I'm Yorkshire born and bred, but I have moved around with work and had a lot of exposure to mass media, and I'm sure I am fairly typical.
Came across your post just after grabbing this:
568769

In my day there would have been an 'on' before 'Tuesday', but then it was The Manchester Guardian. Now it's the global Guardian, and increasingly speaks global English. Which is to say, American.
 

CanucksTraveller

Macho Business Donkey Wrestler
Location
Hertfordshire
I am guessing this means they can't even be bothered to write "Kind regards" any more?
I hate that too. I have a female colleague in the US who signs off:

"Best,

Anna."

Best what? Is it that much of an inconvenience to say best wishes, or best regards, or "Best Physics student 2018, California Tech" or whatever her "best" is?
 

RichardB

Slightly retro
Location
West Wales
Came across your post just after grabbing this:
View attachment 568769
In my day there would have been an 'on' before 'Tuesday', but then it was The Manchester Guardian. Now it's the global Guardian, and increasingly speaks global English. Which is to say, American.
Yes, I've noticed that in American English - "The family will return home Tuesday." BritEng would have 'on Tuesday'.

The Global Grauniad is also guilty of ambiguity through its desire to sound current. Do they mean

"On Tuesday night, Pence ruled out doing that" (he said it on Tuesday night)

or

"Pence ruled out doing that on Tuesday night" (the canceled activity was scheduled for Tuesday night)?

Could mean either. Mind you, the Graun's standards have fallen so far since the Manchester days that nothing surprise me.
 
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