Are these times any good for a beginner.

philthecat

New Member
I have only taken up cycling this year and use an indoor bike currently. Not an expensive one though. I have no idea if these times are any good. I have set myself a target to cycle a marathon (42.17km) in under an hour. Thanks
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Ming the Merciless

There is no mercy
Location
Inside my skull
Distance on an indoor trainer has to be taken with a pinch of salt. So I wouldn’t worry about trying to compare it to anyone else. It’s meaningless. Good luck getting that distance under an hour on your trainer.
 

DRM

Veteran
Location
West Yorks
42 Km’s on an indoor bike are nothing like the same distance outside, outside I would expect that distance to be done in about 2 hours ish , doing it in an hour will have world tour teams chasing your signature, closely followed by UCI testers wanting blood and urine samples
 
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philthecat

New Member
42 Km’s on an indoor bike are nothing like the same distance outside, outside I would expect that distance to be done in about 2 hours ish , doing it in an hour will have world tour teams chasing your signature, closely followed by UCI testers wanting blood and urine samples
😂😂 thanks for the info. 👍👍
 
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philthecat

New Member
42 Km’s on an indoor bike are nothing like the same distance outside, outside I would expect that distance to be done in about 2 hours ish , doing it in an hour will have world tour teams chasing your signature, closely followed by UCI testers wanting blood and urine samples
Distance on an indoor trainer has to be taken with a pinch of salt. So I wouldn’t worry about trying to compare it to anyone else. It’s meaningless. Good luck getting that distance under an hour on your trainer.
Thanks for the info mate. 👍👍
 
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vickster

Legendary Member
You haven’t been anywhere so no KMs actually covered. However, spending 70 minutes on a turbo is decent going (or is it a spin or exercise bike, that’s not really cycling but CV exercise).
It’s now spring so get outside and go somewhere scenic :okay:
 

Sharky

Guru
Location
Kent
In the world of UK timetrials, courses are such that you start and finish close together. This means that head/tail winds are compensated, as to is the gradients. This gives a reasonable metric for comparing yourself to other riders across the country.

So if you can beat 20mph (30mins)on an out and back 10 mile course, you have done a good ride.

Recommend joining a club and riding a few 10 mile timetrials. A good club rider will be aiming for 24 mins (25mph) and a top UK rider would be close to 20mins.

Good luck
 
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philthecat

New Member
In the world of UK timetrials, courses are such that you start and finish close together. This means that head/tail winds are compensated, as to is the gradients. This gives a reasonable metric for comparing yourself to other riders across the country.

So if you can beat 20mph (30mins)on an out and back 10 mile course, you have done a good ride.

Recommend joining a club and riding a few 10 mile timetrials. A good club rider will be aiming for 24 mins (25mph) and a top UK rider would be close to 20mins.

Good luck
Thanks for the Info Sharky. Very interesting. Need to get a bike first 🤣🤣
 
Good evening,

If you go to https://www.cyclingtimetrials.org.uk/find-a-course you can find a time trial course near to you, hopefully.

As these courses are just routes on public roads you can ride them yourself whenever you like.

Once you have found a course, you will find that it has a code something like K46/10. You can then search for that course code and local club's time trials results to see how you compare. As nowadays many casual triathletes also do these events so you won't just see times set by dedicated TTers on expensive dedicated TT bikes.:smile:

I agree with the 20/25mph comments above, but 20mph is faster than it sounds so don't be surprised if you get onto the road and find it initially unachievable.

Bye

Ian
 

Teamfixed

Tim Lewis
I agree with the above posters.... ask around where you live and you may find a local club running a weekly evening 10. This would give you a completely realistic measure and is also a good social thing.
You don't have to join a club (pretty sure not) if you prefer to wait a while but you will have to have third party insurance to enter a time trial from the likes of the CTC.
 
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philthecat

New Member
Good evening,

If you go to https://www.cyclingtimetrials.org.uk/find-a-course you can find a time trial course near to you, hopefully.

As these courses are just routes on public roads you can ride them yourself whenever you like.

Once you have found a course, you will find that it has a code something like K46/10. You can then search for that course code and local club's time trials results to see how you compare. As nowadays many casual triathletes also do these events so you won't just see times set by dedicated TTers on expensive dedicated TT bikes.:smile:

I agree with the 20/25mph comments above, but 20mph is faster than it sounds so don't be surprised if you get onto the road and find it initially unachievable.

Bye

Ian
Thanks for information Ian. Very useful indeed. 👍
 

Lovacott

Über Member
The real joy of riding a bike is being out in the elements on the different road surfaces whilst negotiating the hills and the traffic. I'm happy if I can cover 15 miles in a hour, beside myself if I can do 20 miles. But I'd be bored sh!tless on an exercise bike in the front room (no matter how many pretend miles I'd covered).
 

Sharky

Guru
Location
Kent
I agree with the above posters.... ask around where you live and you may find a local club running a weekly evening 10. This would give you a completely realistic measure and is also a good social thing.
You don't have to join a club (pretty sure not) if you prefer to wait a while but you will have to have third party insurance to enter a time trial from the likes of the CTC.
Just googled Cycling time trials and it says ...

Entering Events

Whatever type of time trial you are entering, club or open, you must be a member of a club that is affiliated to Cycling Time Trials. Being a BCF or CTC member does not generally qualify you to ride time trials unless your BCF Division or CTC District Association is affiliated to CTT.

However, if you were to turn up at one of our evening 10's, you can join our club on the night and we have a policy of "first year is free".
I'm sure other clubs would have similar arrangements - they are unlikely to turn away a prospective new member.
 
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PaulSB

Legendary Member
I have only taken up cycling this year and use an indoor bike currently. Not an expensive one though. I have no idea if these times are any good. I have set myself a target to cycle a marathon (42.17km) in under an hour. Thanks View attachment 579376
TBH I don't really understand the numbers you've posted.

I have many friends who achieve an average of 42km/hour regularly on Zwift. They are all very experienced and very good cyclists on the real roads. I doubt anyone with a year's experience would hit this level.

You said you started this year? No chance in my opinion.
 
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I've never used a trainer that recorded anything as I am old and cheapskate, I had a set of old school rollers for my road bikes but had no feedback apart from the amount of sweat coating the floor and the pitch of the belt sound changing if I put more grunt in.
As the others have noted an indoor trainer don't translate to the real world, a gentle breeze heading into your face is the same as tilting the road against you to some tune.
I like the idea of trainers that record power output, cumulative output and so on, it appeals to my competitive nature but I cannot stand static cycling, I used to watch the TV on my rollers but as the bike moved about crazily it was an unrewarding effort.
Just train hard if you are good with indoor trainers, the increased strength and the discipline to work do translate to the road.
 
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