COVID Vaccine !

Craig the cyclist

Well-Known Member
There twice earlier this year*, A&E's never once was there premedication offered by a triage nurse. Various injuries, one cause.

*18 times last year, where I walked in.
Ah, ok. In a study where n=1 no triage nurses ever offer medication. I would also venture that they know you, and your idiosyncrasies with regards medication, so leave it as it isn't worth the hassle.

However in the real world, triage nurses work to PGDs or are even ANPs with a prescribing qualification allowing them to assess the patient and offer medication.
 

Craig the cyclist

Well-Known Member
Well it is their job.
If health professionals aren't to believe the patient about taking two paracetamol, why would they believe them about their symptoms?
 

classic33

Legendary Member
Ah, ok. In a study where n=1 no triage nurses ever offer medication. I would also venture that they know you, and your idiosyncrasies with regards medication, so leave it as it isn't worth the hassle.

However in the real world, triage nurses work to PGDs or are even ANPs with a prescribing qualification allowing them to assess the patient and offer medication.
You want to make fun of a persons health/disability, go ahead. I've to consider that first, and it causes conflict/problems.

Whilst the regions A&E's may be familiar to me, they don't all have immediate access to records.

And I have been on the wrong end of a "cock-up" in A&E, medication that the records clearly indicate not to be given, were. Result, the doctor in charge of the A&E finished their shift writing up the incident. I got a visit from management, asking if I wished to take the matter further. "Cock-up" caused by two seperate systems in use. I blamed the person who thought two seperate systems was a better idea than one. Not a good shift for the doctor.


https://www.nhs.uk/nhs-services/urgent-and-emergency-care-services/when-to-go-to-ae/
 

Craig the cyclist

Well-Known Member
ou want to make fun of a persons health/disability, go ahead.
Not taking the mickey, saying that you are very open about your response to many medicines, in an idiosyncratic way. You react to many many medicines how the overwhelming majority people don't, that is idiosyncratic.

How would you feel if when you arrived the HCP told you they were in charge and were not interested in your knowledge of your own condition and treatments?

That is what is being suggested here by others who say it is all about the HCP and not the patient
 

classic33

Legendary Member
Not taking the mickey, saying that you are very open about your response to many medicines, in an idiosyncratic way. You react to many many medicines how the overwhelming majority people don't, that is idiosyncratic.

How would you feel if when you arrived the HCP told you they were in charge and were not interested in your knowledge of your own condition and treatments?

That is what is being suggested here by others who say it is all about the HCP and not the patient
If I'm open about the condition, epilepsy, it may just make someone else feel they can talk about it. It's nothing I, or anyone else, did or didn't do. I was born with it.

I've had the professional tell me they were in charge, and ended up having a "return visit". Sometimes within minutes of leaving. Medications interact, not always in a good way, that's when problems start.

To try and get this thread back on topic, how many other cases has there been of anaphylactic shock to any of the vaccines in use has there been? Then consider that just 37 cases(UK only) of blood clotting has had doubt cast over the safety of the vaccines. How many have been vaccinated/received a vaccine, in the UK? I'm in a minority and well aware of it.

I've not tried to scare anyone with what happened to me, with the first vaccine given to date. Every other that most on here will have had, are considered as the risks outweighing the benefits, for me, so were never given. It's no fun having people poking fun at the condition, or how I've to live with it.
 

Ajax Bay

Guru
Location
East Devon
Everyone who has had the jab knows what they have been given.
If you rock up for the second and don't know what you had say that. If you know what you had and the one you are getting now doesn't match, say something.

So, just to get this straight, is the opinion on here that health professionals should not rely on the patient to know about their treatment, and they should be in total control of the whole process to ensure no cock-ups?

That is what is being suggested here by others who say it is all about the HCP and not the patient.
Craig I suggest you are making too many assumptions about the woman on the Clapham omnibus heading for their second jab.
I assert that if you did a poll a fair proportion would not be able state which make of vaccine they'd received first time out.
"If you rock up for the second and don't know what you had you say that" IF the health care professional (HCP) who man the front desk (see below) asks the question.
"If you know what you had and [you realise, somehow] the one you are getting now doesn't match, say something." (But recall the issue of doctor knows best and many individuals' preference 'not to make a fuss' which I described ^^^. Also bear in mind that again a fair proportion of the population will not know that the direction is that the same make of vaccine be given for the second dose.
Don't know about others my opinion is that the system/protocol must have sufficient checks built in to allow the HCPs not to need to rely on the patient to know any more than they're going for their second vaccine. And yes they should be in total control of the whole process (which includes getting informed consent aiui) to ensure no cock-ups.
https://www.gov.uk/government/publi...covid-19-mrna-vaccine-bnt162b2-pfizerbiontech
Table 1: Operational stages of activity under this protocol

Stage 1​
  • Assessment of the individual presenting for vaccination
  • Provide information and obtain informed consent[1]
  • Provide advice to the individual
Registered Healthcare Professionals Only​
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: C R

Milkfloat

An Peanut
Location
Midlands
Anyone who has had even a few interactions with medical professionals should have worked out pretty damn quickly that "Doctor knows best" is total nonsense. It is a partnership between you and the medic. You have the history and experience the symptoms, the Doctor hopefully has the medical knowledge, but is usually overworked, stressed and is frankly not as invested in the outcome as you.
 

Ajax Bay

Guru
Location
East Devon
Anyone who has had even a few interactions with medical professionals should have worked out pretty damn quickly that "Doctor knows best" is total nonsense. It is a partnership between you and the medic. You have the history and experience the symptoms, the Doctor hopefully has the medical knowledge, but is usually overworked, stressed and is frankly not as invested in the outcome as you.
Again, (I assert that) the vast majority of the population have not had "significant interactions with medical professionals" so will operate on 'doctor knows best' until experience suggests otherwise. Those that have, like you maybe and others on here, will take a special interest: but I suggest this is atypical.
Getting a second jab is not a history and symptoms encounter. The data are pretty simple and an individual attending an appointment that they've been invited to, might and should be able to assume that identity plus vaccine given at first dose and date are foundation stuff which the HCP at the desk possess. They'll be asked about 'previous' as a matter of course and can respond intelligently then. The average IQ within the population is, aiui, 100.
I saw minimal stress nor overwork in my first jab visit to our local (multi-surgery) vaccination centre and believe all those working there WERE fully "invested in the outcome". I will have the opportunity to check the ambiance there next week.
 
Last edited:

Pale Rider

Legendary Member
I will use whatever knowledge I have to assist in me getting better treatment.

On many occasions, I lack the knowledge to be of much help to myself.

But checking I'm getting the same vaccine second time around is so simple and easy to do.

Why wouldn't everyone do it?
 
Top Bottom