Di2 in the sales ...is it worth it

OP
gmw492

gmw492

Senior Member
If I had spent the extra money I would now be sitting here feeling terrible about having wasted family funds on something I didn't really need.
Yes fully understand that’s why I never bothered to look at Di2 but it is only £100 more in the sale for the same bike as Ultegra mechanical model £500 off the Di2
 
OP
gmw492

gmw492

Senior Member
The D-fly unit looks good when set up with the Garmin too another reason why it looks appealing, full control over your Garmin just another plus for a better cycling experience with Di2, comments are really good thanks guys lots of details
 
Location
London
Yes fully understand that’s why I never bothered to look at Di2 but it is only £100 more in the sale for the same bike as Ultegra mechanical model £500 off the Di2
mm - but could it be it's a cunning plan to suck you in? - far more than £100 will be heading from you I reckon once you have snorted the free powder.
sorry folks - am sure it's very clever but I don't do the sort of riding which needs it - probably shouldn't have replied but been watching this thread with a certain bemusement.
enjoy your rides folks on whatever.
 

Globalti

Legendary Member
Reading some of the stuff on here I'm beginning to suspect it's a technical nightmare to get it set up right. This seems to go against the grain of cycling as a simple, low-tech sport so I'll stick with cables.
 
Location
London
Reading some of the stuff on here I'm beginning to suspect it's a technical nightmare to get it set up right. This seems to go against the grain of cycling as a simple, low-tech sport so I'll stick with cables.
can't help but reply.
One thing I'm wondering after all the more involved tech stuff upthread is whether there is also an "end of life" issue with some of this stuff?
I am sort of assuming that there are software updates.
If you don't like an update or it causes issues (not unknown) can you roll back to a previous version?
Even if there is a "factory" reset this is not necessarily the same thing.

Was amused by the case upthread where the damn thing seemed to "synchro" up the gears at the back when you changed down at the front, not knowing that you had done that because there was a bloody great hill in front of you. I did learn that this could be countered by selecting another mode though.
Next step is for it to read the terrain ahead from gps data so that it can see the hill?
 

tom73

Veteran
Location
Yorkshire
No different to say most smart phone software.
at some point if not already if you look hard enough they will be a work around.
I take it it's not open source ?
 

JhnBssll

Über Member
Location
Suffolk
Fear not, setup is easier than mechanical and my experience to date is that it is at least as reliable.

I can completely understand people being nervous of it, and people not wanting it. But for those that are interested in the concept of owning a Di2 equipped bike I would wholeheartedly recommend it :okay:
 
I think I’ve updated once in over two years ,if you don’t bother it still works fine
other than that no need to touch it
if it comes set up ready to ride as it should you won’t have any problems
like it or not it’s the future ,as prices drop more people will upgrade
there will always be haters as with anything new or different
some people just don’t like change
 

Globalti

Legendary Member
As I wrote elsewhere I've tried Shimano, SRAM and Campag electronic shifting during Cyclist track days and I thought they were all magnificent. It's just that I can't justify spending an extra £1000 on a system I probably can't repair or will be expensive to repair in case of damage, weighs more than a cable system and - presumably - will need a new battery in a few years. A well-maintained cable system does everything an electronic system can do and by gauging the amount of lever I'm needing to push before it triggers a shift I can sense when the system needs adjustment.
 
Location
Loch side.
Reading some of the stuff on here I'm beginning to suspect it's a technical nightmare to get it set up right. This seems to go against the grain of cycling as a simple, low-tech sport so I'll stick with cables.
Naaah, it's a doddle to set up. Admittedly you have read about some snags, particularly with more exotic setups like mine, but that's present in mechanical systems too. The average set-up is a non-issue. It works out of the box.

The sophistication of the system is hidden by its simplicity. It works on a CAN bus (Controller Access Network). This reduces the number of wires required since a single cable link can go from component to component. The wire is only 3mm thick and very flexible. It can be made invisible on your bike, especially if you have a Di2 frame or, you modify your frame with a port or two.

How do you set it up? You bolt on all your components as usual, install a battery either in the seatpost or at the water bottle and, connect the two, three or four wires. It works immediately and out of the box. Only when you want to change the standard functions, do you have to bother with software. For instance, if you want to swap which buttons do what or, want to try (you don't have to) some sort of fancy intelligent shifting.

Even then it is easy. It can connect to your smartphone via Bluetooth LE (Low Energy) and from there you can do some stuff - not endless nonsense, but useful things. Shimano's software is bug-free and super well thought out.

The system can integrate with ANT+ devices so that you can have all your data and readings on one device. If you don't want comms, you can buy a cheaper junction box.

Mountain bikers can go further and connect their compatible suspension to the system and "tune" it, if tuning is your thing.
Road bikers can add extra shift switches wherever they want them. On the top of the bars, on the bar ends - the choice is endless.

Your bike will require charging two, maybe three times a season. Charging cycles are quoted in kilometers (2000 is typical) but that is of course nonsense. If you change gears a million times, then battery life will be shorter. When you theoretically run out of power on a ride, the system shuts down non-essential functions first, before stranding you in a single gear. Stage racers don't have to charge between stages. Compare that to stage races where you have to change cables, particularly on MTB races. I have done such races where a cable service was required every single night. I could have slept during those hours instead of fiddling with dirty cables.

To me, the biggest advantage is getting rid of gear shifter cables and cleaning up the frame. Second advantage is zero adjustment. Adjusting cable derailers isn't a big deal if you know how, but zero adjusting is just better.

Lastly, it comes in mechanical and hydraulic brake version. This means you can be a retro grouch and be electronic or, go full hog and get with the program, disc brakes and all.

Bring me that fancy new Spez of yours and I'll drill it for Di2.
 

Smokin Joe

Legendary Member
Not forgetting that wires will soon be old hat. SRAM are wireless as is the new FSA gear system and you can bet your bottom dollar that Campag and Shimano are in advanced stages of development with their own.

Once R&D costs are recouped and electronic gears start to become the norm (Which they will, driven by the younger generation of cyclists who won't be cluttered with the "Cables always worked for me so why change" mindset) prices will plummet as they have done with all technology. Electronics are cheap as chips to mass produce.

When STI/Ergo first appeared prices were eye watering, now they are standard even on what most would dismiss as BSO's.
 
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