DIY again, fitting curved acrylic bath panel

Andywinds

Senior Member
Hi again, I don't really want to get the plumber back to do this work and so was looking online for some instructions to do this. I've found information on how to fit a flat panel but not a curved one. I do have some plastic fittings for this. do I still need to fit a piece of baton to the floor even if the curved section will not reach it?
 
stick some images up andy, I am sure all the diy nutters will be pleased to help ^_^
 

steve50

Disenchanted Member
Location
West Yorkshire
i would fit some batons at strategic points to stop the panel from moving should it get accidentally kicked , if the bath is fibreglass reinforced plastic i would also fit some T brace supports along the side of the bath to stop the bath side from flexing.
 
OP
Andywinds

Andywinds

Senior Member
i would fit some batons at strategic points to stop the panel from moving should it get accidentally kicked , if the bath is fibreglass reinforced plastic i would also fit some T brace supports along the side of the bath to stop the bath side from flexing.
ok, The bath is supposed to be extra strong reinforced acrylic. Will look at fitting some batons, thanks.
 

Bazzer

Setting the controls for the heart of the sun.
When screwed to the wooden blocks you can see under your bath rim, the pieces of plastic they become clips which hold the top edge of the side of the bath. You should have more of the plastic pieces than blocks under the bath rim. The surplus ones are fixed to the floor to create the same clips to hold the bottom of the side piece. Just make sure the clips are set directly below those on the bath, otherwise your side panel will not be vertical.
If the bottom edge of the bath side is the same as the top, i.e. you have a 90 degree lip, fitting additional blocks to the floor as an extra precaution of the side panel being kicked in might be difficult unless you make a cut out in the wood for the panel to fit under.
 

Levo-Lon

Guru
When i fitted mine i had the height correct and new lino flooring fitted so it goes 100mm under the panel before fitting the panel.
mine has a few blocks of wood on the floor to stop the panel moving inwards.
the clips go top and bottom if poss.
if you have a gap at the bottom that is unacceptable then you need to fit a wood or plastic plynth.
so if thats the case fit the panel so its fixed at the top and follow the curve and mark the floor with a marker so you can fit a wood or plastic plynth.
you will need to put a few cuts in the wood or plastic "almost all the way across" you may need a cut every 10mm to achieve this so it can bend to the shape.
or simply cut a few small blocks and work round the curve that way.
fill and paint after or use a mastic if plastic..but plastic wont rot and will be white.

hth
 

MrGrumpy

Huge Member
Location
Fly Fifer
Fitting mine was a monumental f up on my behalf, I also had to cut into both walls either end of bath to fit bath and panel. That was tricky as was tiling floor and wall, not my finest hour and would think long and hard next time ! Your one looks easier than mine, ours is crescent shaped if you like . You live and learn though and to be fair I did all the work including tap outs the wall etc. my neighbours got b&q bathroom and fitters and it has been one disaster after another and that is so called professionals!!
 
OP
Andywinds

Andywinds

Senior Member
All this sort of stuff is not hard it just takes experience, but then you could say that about a lot of things in DIY. My bath panel can fit up against the bath without any problems it's just knowing how and best to do it. My brother-in-law is a plumber and has probably done this before, but waiting for him to pull his finger out is a complete nightmare! I do have another plumber mate.
 
is the panel just slightly shorter than the height of the bath?

if so, fit some clips to the bottom horizontal edge and fix some batten to the floor that you can fit the other part of the clip to, these must align once the panel is in place, lift the panel into the underside of the bath, the timber pieces are there to locate the panel at the top, you should be able to lift it high enough to raise the bottom enough to overlap the clips, then drop the panel down.

a glass sucker would really help when handling the panel too.

best of luck.

ps, told you about the diy nutters
 
OP
Andywinds

Andywinds

Senior Member
Here is how it looks without any fittings. With all these excellent comments I think I might wait for someone that knows what they're doing, its frustrating that something that looks so simple can be a pain. I can't even find a YouTube clip, and everything is on YouTube!
 

Attachments

Very timely post from the OP as I'm about to move house, and a new bathroom likely on the agenda afterward. the moral for me is get a bath with straight panels. I could easily and inadvertantly made work for myself as the curved end for a shower but had seemed quite sensible, but I can see the snag now.
 

Globalti

Legendary Member
Our advice after having fitted a P shaped bath? Don't - go conventional. P shaped uses too much water on the rare occasions when you do want a bath.
 
OP
Andywinds

Andywinds

Senior Member
Our advice after having fitted a P shaped bath? Don't - go conventional. P shaped uses too much water on the rare occasions when you do want a bath.
That a very valid point. We've not used the bath yet but we've already established that this will take up a lot of water, does look nice though! It will be mainly used as a shower. Just couldn't afford to fit a separate shower unit in this bathroom.
 
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