Doing up a Dawes Galaxy (Shimano bits advice)

Discussion in 'Touring and Adventure Cycling' started by Jugular, 30 Apr 2010.

  1. Jugular

    Jugular Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Manchester
    I have an old Dawes, and I mean old, like 30 years or something, that's ancient I'm sure of it. People tell me I should bin it, but I like it, and it aint all bad surely.

    I'm planning on buying some Paul Hewitt wheels and getting the frame renovated and repainted by Ellis Briggs then I'm going to have to refit the bike with some decent components. Unfortunately the older kit on it has seen better days. So, I figure instead of scrabbling around for all the right kit to bring it back to it's heyday, I'll drag it kicking and screaming into 2010 and all that entails in terms of a new drivetrain. So, (don't worry I'll get to the point eventually, just be patient) what are my options and what on earth do all those Shimano codes and bits mean (Tiagra, Ultegra, Deore, XT LX QR FP YU, yeah ok I made some up)?

    What do I need for touring and the odd blast through the countryside?
     
  2. ComedyPilot

    ComedyPilot Secret Lemonade Drinker

    If you take their advice then, a) you're crackers, and ;) I will drive over the pennines to get it out of the skip.
     
  3. Anthony

    Anthony New Member

    Location:
    Wokingham
    For a touring set up I would suggest you have two options. A Shimano Deore set would be a good/reliable choice and not break the bank. Modern Galaxys come with many deore components. If you've got a bit more money to splash then you could upgrade to the better Shimano Deore XT parts.
     
  4. rich p

    rich p ridiculous old lush

    Location:
    Brighton
    Have you added up the cost of replacing everything including a respray compared with a new or secondhand new one? Components can come in pretty pricily these days. Also check that there is no rust about to scupper it!
     
  5. Gerry Attrick

    Gerry Attrick Lincolnshire Mountain Rescue Consultant

    Here is some information about the hierarchy of Shimano kit:

    MOUNTAIN BIKES
    SIS 5SPEED/6SP/7SP.
    ALTUS 7SP.
    ACERA 7SP/8SP.
    The above (3) are mainly used on bikes that are used on weekends,bike path riding and some commuting bikes.
    ALIVO 7SP/8SP.
    DEORE 9sp.
    These (2) are used a lot by people who commute most days as well as for bikes which are ridden on weekends. This componentry is suitable for off road use and is generally a good starting point for racing components.
    DEORE LX 9SP.
    LX is a very good quality component which is well weighted and designed. LX is mainly used for serious recreation and racing. As well as for those people who want a very stable and strong commuting bike.
    DEORE XT 9SP.
    XT is once again a very smooth and reliable group set, used on many racebikes as well as top end town bikes. XT is remarkably strong and very durable as well as being a delight to use.2004 saw a big change in LX when the hollow tech 2 crank set was introduced, as well as the introduction of the rapid shift levers
    DEORE XTR 9SP.
    XTR is predominately used on top end race bikes. It is very light and smooth, however it does require some maintenance as it is such a precision made component.XTR also has the Hollow tech 2 crank set with an awesome disc brake and wheel set being available
    The above groupsets are how we in the bicycle industry group the qualities of parts, meaning the parts on the bike such as gears , brakes, hubs, cranks etc., to a bike. For example a bicycle with an Alloy frame and ALIVO components will vary in price from $500 -$700 depending on the other components such as rims, handle bars, seats and forks. What we are trying to show you is that there is a method to the madness.
    ROAD BIKES.
    SIS.
    SORA.
    SIS is not found on many road bikes now.However Sora is extremely popular. Many general commuting and entry level road bikes will be Sora equipped. Sora has STI levers and a very reliable gear and braking system, without being to pricey. Sora is a 8sp group set and will come on bicyles ranged between $700-$1200.
    Tiagra.
    Tiagra is the first road group set that is 9sp. Tiagra is used a lot by road cyclists that want the reliablity and smoothness of 9sp without the price tag.
    105.
    This is a very commonly used component set a lot of top road bikes and training bikes will be equipped with 105 as it is exceptionally smooth in its changes and a very durable and reliable group set. 105 is a 9 or 10sp group set and its body predominantly made of alloy, thus making it very light.People who want good stuff that will last this is it.
    ULTEGRA.
    Once again used a lot for top end racing. Not often used for training bikes, however it is durable enough to do so. Very smooth and very light on its actions. This means changes with little effort.
    DURA ACE.
    The top of the line. Fairly expensive for the general rider, but verrrrrry nice.Dura Ace has been converted into a 10sp system, with massive changes to the levers and crank sets, both so much smoother and lighter to use.Ride it and you will understand.
    MOUNTAIN BIKES
    SIS 5SPEED/6SP/7SP.
    ALTUS 7SP.
    ACERA 7SP/8SP.
    The above (3) are mainly used on bikes that are used on weekends,bike path riding and some commuting bikes.
    ALIVO 7SP/8SP.
    DEORE 9sp.
    These (2) are used a lot by people who commute most days as well as for bikes which are ridden on weekends. This componentry is suitable for off road use and is generally a good starting point for racing components.
    DEORE LX 9SP.
    LX is a very good quality component which is well weighted and designed. LX is mainly used for serious recreation and racing. As well as for those people who want a very stable and strong commuting bike.
    DEORE XT 9SP.
    XT is once again a very smooth and reliable group set, used on many racebikes as well as top end town bikes. XT is remarkably strong and very durable as well as being a delight to use.2004 saw a big change in LX when the hollow tech 2 crank set was introduced, as well as the introduction of the rapid shift levers
    DEORE XTR 9SP.
    XTR is predominately used on top end race bikes. It is very light and smooth, however it does require some maintenance as it is such a precision made component.XTR also has the Hollow tech 2 crank set with an awesome disc brake and wheel set being available
    The above groupsets are how we in the bicycle industry group the qualities of parts, meaning the parts on the bike such as gears , brakes, hubs, cranks etc., to a bike. For example a bicycle with an Alloy frame and ALIVO components will vary in price from $500 -$700 depending on the other components such as rims, handle bars, seats and forks. What we are trying to show you is that there is a method to the madness.
    ROAD BIKES.
    SIS.
    SORA.
    SIS is not found on many road bikes now.However Sora is extremely popular. Many general commuting and entry level road bikes will be Sora equipped. Sora has STI levers and a very reliable gear and braking system, without being to pricey. Sora is a 8sp group set and will come on bicyles ranged between $700-$1200.
    Tiagra.
    Tiagra is the first road group set that is 9sp. Tiagra is used a lot by road cyclists that want the reliablity and smoothness of 9sp without the price tag.
    105.
    This is a very commonly used component set a lot of top road bikes and training bikes will be equipped with 105 as it is exceptionally smooth in its changes and a very durable and reliable group set. 105 is a 9 or 10sp group set and its body predominantly made of alloy, thus making it very light.People who want good stuff that will last this is it.
    ULTEGRA.
    Once again used a lot for top end racing. Not often used for training bikes, however it is durable enough to do so. Very smooth and very light on its actions. This means changes with little effort.
    DURA ACE.
    The top of the line. Fairly expensive for the general rider, but verrrrrry nice.Dura Ace has been converted into a 10sp system, with massive changes to the levers and crank sets, both so much smoother and lighter to use.Ride it and you will understand.
     
  6. snorri

    snorri Legendary Member

    Rohloff.
    I got thoroughly fed up with the vast range of Shimano components and their short lived efficiency. The crunch came in Germany when once again my tour was interupted by a worn out component. The bike shop mechanic approached me with a worrying look saying he had no direct replacement, but had another which would be cheaper and more longlasting, would that be ok for me? Well of coure it would, but why had a previous mechanic fitted an expensive short lived componment?
    Fed up with the whole Shimano thing I resolved to fit a Rohloff hub and have never looked back.
    In a strange sort of way I do miss the camaraderie of the people you meet in foreign bicycle shops, I'll get over that though.:wacko:xx(
     
  7. aberal

    aberal Senior Member

    Location:
    Midlothian
    The problem with old frames isn't necessarily visible external rust but internal rust within the tubes which can weaken the frame and blow it from inside out. I'm not saying that that is necessarily going to be the case, but it's best to be aware of it as a potential problem. Also, you might be surprised once you cost all the components how little extra money you would need to get yourself a brand new Galaxy.
     
  8. Arch

    Arch Married to Night Train

    Location:
    Salford, UK
    But you can still go into the shops. You'll just end up with a very exotic bell collection.:biggrin:
     
  9. Arch

    Arch Married to Night Train

    Location:
    Salford, UK
    Oh, and I recently rebuilt my Galaxy, and spent minimal amounts - I think £100-150 all in, that included a new rack, crankset, brakes and levers and other odds and ends. Ok, I've not used it a lot yet, so I don't know about the longevity, but I reckon you needn't break the bank. Also, don't worry about it being period, OR being bang up to date. Choose the sort of things you get on with best.
     
  10. I rebuilt my old Galaxy - including a very expensive respray by George Longstaff - about twelve years ago. I spent waaaay more than it was actually worth, about £400 all in, but it's been a great bike and I'd do the same again.
     
  11. snorri

    snorri Legendary Member

    You think you are joking? A new bell is just what I took home from my last summer tour.:biggrin:
     
  12. Arch

    Arch Married to Night Train

    Location:
    Salford, UK
    And it's one of the two things I brought back from the SPEZI show! I very neat little revolving one, you twist the grippy bit round the edge for a constant brrrring-bringg-brinng. And it's clear plastic, so you can see the workings.:biggrin:

    From Manybells.

    http://www.manybells-server.com/product_info.php?products_id=41

    That and a water bottle with Ganesh on it.

    There were a couple of guys on the bus trip who went home with 5 or 6 different bells!
     
  13. Arch

    Arch Married to Night Train

    Location:
    Salford, UK
    Well, I've just looked Ganesh up on Wiki (I'll admit, I bought it for the elephant image), and I find he is revered as 'a remover of obstacles'. What more could a cyclist need?:thumbsup:
     
  14. loz

    loz Über Member

    Location:
    Tunbridge Wells
    the good thing about building a frame up yourself is that you're forced to understand how to setup the various components (useful for when you need to fettle in the future) and which components are compatible (eg you need to consider rear drop out spacing before buying wheels etc). Buying a new bike means you lose the need for this knowledge - which is fine until you need to fix something on the road
     
  15. PpPete

    PpPete Guru

    Location:
    Chandler's Ford
    Good advice.

    FWIW - My Galaxy cost £370 new in 1988. I've spent nearly £400 putting modern wheels & componentry on it. It's now roughly at spec level between that of a new Super Galaxy and a new Ultra Galaxy (at £1700), and it's light too, because I've used road bits rather than MTB.
     
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