Double-vaxxed and CV19 for the second time?

Fab Foodie

hanging-on in quiet desperation ...
My Daughter had CV19 soon after the start of the Pandemic in the UK, early part of the first wave. Since then she has been double-vaxxed and now has contracted CV19 a second time (LF and PCR positive). Appreciate the vaccines are not 100%

Anyone know how common an occurrence this is?

Clearly it's a risk for all, but it's made me rethink social distancing and crowds etc. She was partying with her gf's at the weekend in Nottingham, all of whom had joined her from different parts of the country.
My social contact bubble has been quite small for the last 18 months, but now am travelling around Europe again, so will probs need to keep a higher level of vigilance :-(
Like Flu, we're gonna have to live with this for a very very long time....
 

Dolorous Edd

Senior Member
Second infections appear to be quite common, even for people who have been vaccinated. Serious illness remains rare for people who have been vaccinated.

As you say, we are moving towards a situation where Covid is like flu. Not nice, and occasionally dangerous, but not a reason to take extraordinary measures. Although the bar on 'ordinary' has probably shifted a bit for a long time to come.
 

welsh dragon

Thanks but no thanks. I think I'll pass.
We are still wearing masks in shops and stores and on public transport here in Wales and most people are still adhering to that. I will continue to stay well clear of people and will carry on wearing my mask as well.

As said having the jab doesn't prevent you from getting it a second time but hopefully it won't be serious enough to put the majority in hospital.

Stay safe peeps:okay:
 

Slick

Guru
It appears to be a timing issue more than anything else, with 6 months protection seemingly being suggested as the rule of thumb. I think I read that double vaccinated and recovered from Covid-19 would offer something like 94% protection or thereabouts. I don't think anyone has suggested once you have had it, you won't get it again. Keep wearing those masks. :okay:
 

fossyant

Ride It Like You Stole It!
Location
South Manchester
It at least prevents those at risk dying. Still being cautious. Spent two weekends with mates and we all did LFT's before hand.

Our caravan site pub has brought in Covid 'passes' as well as the club - all clubbers in Wales now have to have covid passes.
 

Cycleops

Legendary Member
Location
Accra, Ghana
My social contact bubble has been quite small for the last 18 months, but now am travelling around Europe again, so will probs need to keep a higher level of vigilance :-(
Like Flu, we're gonna have to live with this for a very very long time....
Difficult to know how to maintain a 'higher level of vigilance'. You can wear a mask and sanitise your hands multiple times a day but will that be fully effective? We really don't know.
Your last sentence is most telling I believe. We just have to manage it as best we can.
 
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OP
Fab Foodie

Fab Foodie

hanging-on in quiet desperation ...
Difficult to know how to maintain a 'higher level of vigilance'. You can wear a mask and sanitise your hands multiple times a day but will that be fully effective? We really don't know.
Your last sentence is most telling I believe. We just have to manage it as best we can.
Well here in Engurlund, mask wearing and social distancing has all but disappeared. I still wear mine most of the time in shops and busy areas, but not 100% of the time as before, but it's a good reminder to carry and wear more often.
In airports and many places in EU mask wearing is still mandatory.

Every little helps....
 

Rocky

Hello decadence
I do hope your daughter is ok, Fabbers. The evidence, as I understand it, shows being fully vaxed does prevent some reinfection but not all. Its major effect is to do reduce the severity of subsequent infections and it seems very good at preventing hospital admission. I know of quite a few vaxed GPs who have recently caught covid and felt rotten but none has ended up in hospital.
 
Best wishes to your daughter @Fab Foodie
 

Ming the Merciless

There is no mercy
Location
Inside my skull
Vaccination primes your immune system against a particular disease. It doesn’t prevent the virus getting inside your body. What it does do is give your immune system a head start on recognising it and neutralising it before it leads to more serious disease.

We each have unique immune systems. For some of us vaccination is enough to prevent symptoms , others mild symptoms, yet others stronger symptoms, and for a few they may still face hospitalisation.

Bit like mumps, measles, tetanus etc. The vaccinations don’t prevent infection but for vast majority mean infection is no longer a serious concern.
 
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markemark

Well-Known Member
We’ll here’s the rub. Been vaxed. Recommend everyone does so. It reduces onward transmission. Which is great if we had a policy of stamping it out. But we don’t. So my guess is that everyone will get it. Some more than once. Then being vaxed does little to protect society in terms of infection. It will, however, massively rescued the risks which will lessen the burden on the nhs making it safer for everyone.
But ultimately, everyone will get it. The uvaxed will be disproportionately hospitalised abd killed by it. But I’ve stopped caring about them. As for society, the unvaxed won’t put the rest of us in greater danger.
 

Ming the Merciless

There is no mercy
Location
Inside my skull
We’ll here’s the rub. Been vaxed. Recommend everyone does so. It reduces onward transmission. Which is great if we had a policy of stamping it out. But we don’t. So my guess is that everyone will get it. Some more than once. Then being vaxed does little to protect society in terms of infection.
The studies that have been done would appear to disagree that vaccination does little to prevent onward transmission. As always experts speak with circumspection where as us punters speak with conviction.

“According to the measurements, the amount of nasopharyngeal viral RNA detected by an RT-PCR test was 3 to 4.5 times lower among patients who had received a dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine within at least the past twelve days, than in unvaccinated individuals. This suggests that nasopharyngeal carriage declines markedly as the vaccine-induced immune response develops.

It is reasonable to think that carrying less virus means being less infectious, which is encouraging in terms of the potentially lower contagiousness of those vaccinated. However, the minimum amount of virus necessary to transmit the disease is not known at this stage, particularly since this quantity may evolve as a function of future variants of the virus.”

https://scienceblog.com/522486/do-covid-19-vaccines-prevent-infection-and-transmission/
 

markemark

Well-Known Member
The studies that have been done would appear to disagree that vaccination does little to prevent onward transmission. As always experts speak with circumspection where as us punters speak with conviction.

“According to the measurements, the amount of nasopharyngeal viral RNA detected by an RT-PCR test was 3 to 4.5 times lower among patients who had received a dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine within at least the past twelve days, than in unvaccinated individuals. This suggests that nasopharyngeal carriage declines markedly as the vaccine-induced immune response develops.

It is reasonable to think that carrying less virus means being less infectious, which is encouraging in terms of the potentially lower contagiousness of those vaccinated. However, the minimum amount of virus necessary to transmit the disease is not known at this stage, particularly since this quantity may evolve as a function of future variants of the virus.”

https://scienceblog.com/522486/do-covid-19-vaccines-prevent-infection-and-transmission/
Oh I completely agree that it reduces transmission. That was not my point. My point is that the U.K. is not following a policy of trying to stamp it out. Therefore we’ll all get it at some point as it is endemic. That means that transmission rates are irrelevant as it’ll spread through the entire population irrespective. All being vaccinated does for transmission is spread it out across time.
 

si_c

Guru
Location
Wirral
Vaccination is not the silver bullet that many believe it will be. Not least because we haven't even approached the levels of vaccination required to be truly herd-immunised. It does reduce the risk of picking it up if exposed however if in an environment where there are quite a few infectious people the inevitable will happen if social distancing and masking aren't followed.

The severity of COVID has decreased significantly amongst those who are vaccinated and this is it's true usefulness, whilst people are still getting it they aren't dying from it in the numbers they were, nor are they requiring hospitalisation in the same numbers. In fact, quite unhelpfully, those who are vaccinated and young are far more likely to be asymptomatic than those unvaccinated.

This is going to become like Flu, we'll need shots every year and people will still get sick. But eventually it will recede into the background like all the pandemic causing influenza strains of the past.
 

Ming the Merciless

There is no mercy
Location
Inside my skull
Oh I completely agree that it reduces transmission. That was not my point. My point is that the U.K. is not following a policy of trying to stamp it out. Therefore we’ll all get it at some point as it is endemic. That means that transmission rates are irrelevant as it’ll spread through the entire population irrespective. All being vaccinated does for transmission is spread it out across time.
Well of course it will become endemic. The only disease that has been stamped out is small pox. That took a worldwide effort and many many years. More than 10 years, possibly 20 years from memory. You cannot eliminate a transmissible disease as a single country unless you close all your borders including goods in / out.
 
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