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End to End budget bikes...

Discussion in 'Beginners' started by TimC, 21 Apr 2008.

  1. TimC

    TimC New Member

    Location:
    Leeds
    I posted a thread awhile ago about a road bike for the end to end - and I've gone for a 2007 Giant SCR3 because we've an RV carrying the heavy clobber so we don't have any weight to carry.

    Anyway - my mate is looking at other bikes in a similar vein - could ayone either recommend/warn off any of the following bikes please?

    Claud Butler Milano 2007 Road Bike

    Claud Butler Roubaix T 2007 Road Bike

    GT R Series 5 2007 Road Bike

    GT R Series 4 2007 Road Bike

    Thanks again!

    (BTW - I'm happy with the Giant, it flies compared to my MTB - a damn site less forgiving though - I'm aching a bit today!)
     
  2. RedBike

    RedBike New Member

    Location:
    Beside the road
    I would go for something that you can fit a set of mud-guards to. I'm not sure which of them (if any) will accommodate full length guards.
     
  3. TimC

    TimC New Member

    Location:
    Leeds
    thanks - it looks like the claud butlers can take mudguards...

    Does anyone know if these are any cop?
     
  4. John the Monkey

    John the Monkey Frivolous Cyclist

    Location:
    Crewe
    Reviewed here Tim.

    Have you changed your Kenda tyres yet on the Giant? My experience suggests you should... :biggrin:
     
  5. Tynan

    Tynan Veteran

    Location:
    e4
    'There are mudguard eyelets at the rear but not on the fork. However, with only about 10mm of air between tyres and brake calipers, clearance is too tight for anything other than Race Blades.'
     
  6. TimC

    TimC New Member

    Location:
    Leeds
    I've only just got it and did a steady, if hilly 10m sat and 20m Sun to get started - Why should I change the Kenda tyres?
     
  7. John the Monkey

    John the Monkey Frivolous Cyclist

    Location:
    Crewe
    I didn't get on with them at all (or rather, the roads of Manchester didn't) - my four inner tubes were in heavy rotation, and acquired quite a few patches until I changed the Kenda Kontenders the SCR2.0 came with for some Schwalbe Stelvios. I'd have hesitated to do a long trip on the Kontenders, tbh.

    (That said, some people have no problems with them).
     
  8. TimC

    TimC New Member

    Location:
    Leeds
    Right - interestingly, someone else has said that, and recommended Specialized Armadillos for the end to end - what do you reckon?
     
  9. John the Monkey

    John the Monkey Frivolous Cyclist

    Location:
    Crewe
    I can't say really, as I've only used Bontrager Racelite Hardcases (excellent), Panaracer Pasela TGs (great, but a little skittery in the wet - but they do have a tread pattern that might help on loose stuff), the Kendas (more unplanned deflations than every other tyre I've used put together, and the bead began to separate from the body of the tyre :biggrin: ) and the Stelvios.

    Of those, I think the Stelvios and Racelites were the best balance between protection and still rolling nicely. The Paselas are very good tyres too, although I had far fewer miles on those than on the others.

    It's all a trade off really - some tyres give a lot of protection, but don't roll as well because of the inherent extra weight and rigidity of doing that
    job. Others will roll better, but be more prone to unplanned deflation as a result.

    Possibly useful thread;
    http://www.cyclechat.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=6866
     
  10. Tim Bennet.

    Tim Bennet. Entirely Average Member

    Location:
    S of Kendal
    If I was planning an end to end, I think I would prioritise rolling ability. As I don't have a city centre commute, I've found the problem of punctures to be insignificant to say the least.

    Indeed, after thousands of miles of audax riding, I wouldn't expect to get any punctures in Michelin ProRace 2s, (25c) in the distance from JoG to LE. I would, however, enjoy unhindered progress!

    Some cyclists are like children: They're prone to becoming overtyred.
     
  11. Tynan

    Tynan Veteran

    Location:
    e4
    :biggrin:
     
  12. roadiewill

    roadiewill New Member

    Location:
    Wiltshire
    I done about 250 miles on the Kontenders that came with my SCR3 and had no puntures. I want to get some 23s on though, the 26 are too slow
     
  13. RedBike

    RedBike New Member

    Location:
    Beside the road
    Specialized Armadillos are very puncture resistant but they're a terrible tyre.
     
  14. Fab Foodie

    Fab Foodie hanging-on in quiet desperation ...

    Tyres are an interesting topic!

    My cycling buddy has an SCR2 bought March last year, pretty much everywhere he has cycled, I have too. The contenders are completely glitch free, nary a scratch. My Michelin PR2's in 23c (have possibly done twice the mileage (no distance really) and are about to be trashed...several p*nctures and some serious cuts have rendered them not fit for use after 12 months.
    I love them though and am gonna order some PR3's. The first p*ncture happened after less than 100 miles.
    So, Kenda's seem just dandy on Oxforshire roads whilst PR2's took a beating.
    (Mind you, I am 1.5 times the weight of my buddy... if that makes a difference).
     
  15. Tim Bennet.

    Tim Bennet. Entirely Average Member

    Location:
    S of Kendal
    Yes I know. There does seem to be enormous variation in the number of punctures people get. Although it's easy to assume it's due to the vagaries of our city streets, it also appears to be more random than that.

    I know it's courting disaster to say so, but I feel unlucky if I get one puncture a year on the roads and perhaps a couple more on the mountain bike. And I can guarantee both of those off road will either be failure to bunny hop the cross track drains they build round here with sharp slabs of slate, or maybe a thorn in the hedge cutting season.

    As for Mrs TB, I can't remember when she last had a puncture. Years and years ago, and she does a lot of on (and off road) miles in countries all over the world.

    We certainly don't use any special puncture proof tyres, being mainly Panaracer Pasellas on the touring bikes, ProRace 2s on the audax, Fortezza TriComps on the road bikes, some nondescript 26 inch slicks on the winter hacks and MrsTB uses superlight tyres and tubes on her mtb.

    Despite the varying risks, I would still caution against using overly beefy tyres unless you are convinced punctures are a major problem on your ride, or the inconvenience of a puncture is worth the trade off.

    The odd puncture will be a momentary inconvenience, but a dragging tyre will dog you mile after mile after mile after mile....