Has anyone used a Motorcycle chain on single speed bicycle?

keithmac

Veteran
I searched alot for a motorcycle sprocket as chainring, but I couldn't find any for my configuration.
I think it would be an engineering job to modify one, you'd want a rear sprocket as the front chainring but modifying a motorcycle front sprocket to fit a bicycle rear wheel would require an adaptor and a lot of work!.

Saying all that you'd be hard pressed to wear them out. JT sprockets are very hard wearing.
 

silva

Senior Member
Location
Belgium
I think it would be an engineering job to modify one, you'd want a rear sprocket as the front chainring but modifying a motorcycle front sprocket to fit a bicycle rear wheel would require an adaptor and a lot of work!.

Saying all that you'd be hard pressed to wear them out. JT sprockets are very hard wearing.
I asked JT sprockets. They had 1 candidate for my gear:
Thank you for your enquiry.
JT produce final drive sprockets for motorcycle and ATV applications, and we do not offer products for bicycle fitments. Our steel rear sprockets are made from C49 high carbon steel.

We produce one sprocket that matches your 130mm bolt hole PCD, 420 chain size and 47 tooth count, part number JTR215. Please follow the link below for more information.

http://www.jtsprockets.com/catalogue/part/JTR215/

We do not offer a custom sprocket service and are unable to produce "one off" sprockets to suit your requirements.

I hope that this helps and thank you for your interest in JT.
The BCD is 130 mm, but only 4 mount holes, while mine is 5.

About wear, my experience is that the major determiner is the chains wear.
Even a hard wearing sprocket can be worn easily by a worn chain.
Imagine that a sprocket would not wear at all, the teeth would not insert in the links. Something is gotta give, and a chain outnumbers a sprocket, in amount links versus teeth, and metal mass.
 
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OP
GuyBoden

GuyBoden

Veteran
Location
Warrington
I'm hoping that a wide motorcycle sprocket/chainring isn't essential and that the pitch of 1/2 inch is the most important.

Chain-size-chart.png
 
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silva

Senior Member
Location
Belgium
Ofc it isn't essential, one can run any wider chain on any narrower sprocket and the pitch is indeed most important.
Nevertheless, a correct pitch doesn't imply a suitable chain, there are chains that have a larger roller diameter which renders these incompatible.
For ex, years ago I bought some stainless steel roller chains on a flea market together with a whole bag quicklinks dirtcheap, with the idea to mount such one in winter with salty roads. I tried to mount one as a test, I could lay the chain on the ring, but after so many links the rollers didn't drop to the valleys between the teeth anymore. Later on I found in specs of the in steel printed numbers this as reason. It was an industrial chain. JFYI.

Edit: looked it up - I store data in .txt files for later reference.
The printed type was 8BSS
The specs were:

Pitch (P): 1/2"
Roller Width (b1): 0.305 = 7.747 mm
Roller Diameter (d1): 0.335 = 8.509 mm
Overall Width: (L): 0.669 = 16.9926 mm
Pin Diameter (d2): 0.175 = 4.445 mm
Link Plate Height (h2): 0.472 = 11.9888 mm
Link Plate Thickness (T): 0.060 = 1.524 mm
Average Tensile Strength (LBS): 2,727

That roller diameter, 8.509 mm.
5/16" * 25.4 mm = 7,9375 mm.
So, that industrial chain 8BSS had rollers of 0,5715 mm larger than bicycle / motorcycle specifications.
 
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OP
GuyBoden

GuyBoden

Veteran
Location
Warrington
I've received the D.I.D 420D Motorcycle chain with 96 links, it was easy to put onto the bike having the correct number of links, so no splitting needed.

It works fine and seems very robust, I don't think it will be stretching anytime soon.

The 420 size has a 1/4" Roller Width, which works fine, but is much larger than needed, so next time I'll be ordering a 415 size, which has a slightly smaller 3/16" Roller Width.

RK 415 made in Japan chains are on sale here for £8.
https://www.xlmoto.co.uk/mc-parts/c...s-415-630_c155/rk-415hsb-chain_pid-PM-4907102
 

T4tomo

Guru
Chains don't stretch, they wear. They are made of steel, not elastic.

The OP will probably find it was his nuts slipping moving the wheel marginally in the frame.
 
OP
GuyBoden

GuyBoden

Veteran
Location
Warrington
Chains don't stretch, they wear. They are made of steel, not elastic.

The OP will probably find it was his nuts slipping moving the wheel marginally in the frame.
Yes, we use the term stretching, but we all know it really is the metal wearing. The metal between the rivets and the bushes wears first.

No, the cheap chains were stretching, I've been using a chain wear checker that measures the elongation. The checker isn't expensive.

One of these, get one they're very handy, £7 here: :okay:
https://www.velosolo.co.uk/bbbcheck.html
dscn5937a.jpg
 
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keithmac

Veteran
Can't you just "measure" the wear by looking at the chain tensioner position?
That's what youd do with a Motorcycle or single speed bicycle.

The chain stretch tools are for derailleur equipped bikes from what I can see.
 

ColinJ

Puzzle game procrastinator!
That's because chain on top picture is clearly overtensioned. Even 428 motorcycle chain would wear in no time when tensioned like a guitar string.
The chain actually wasn't quite as tight as it looks there. I've had a look back in my photos and found another one taken a few seconds later. You can see that there is actually a few mm of droop in the top run of chain...

620410


The chain wasn't really being tensioned by the tensioner at all in the top picture. The chain was almost skipping over the jockey wheel because it was barely engaged. I had tried it with the tensioner raised but it WAS too tight then - the chain was noisy and didn't run smoothly.

Once the chain has lengthened slightly I don't take up all of the slack. I normally run it with about 8 mm of droop in the top of the chain.
 
OP
GuyBoden

GuyBoden

Veteran
Location
Warrington
I purchased and fitted a RK 415 made in Japan chain for my wife's single sprocket Ridgeback Flight Alfine. I tensioned the chain using the bike's eccentric bottom bracket, it's still slightly loose, but I prefer loose than too tight.

The 415 size size chain is what I'd recommend, as it's slightly narrower than the 420 chain I recently fitted to my track bike.

The RK415 is also pre-stretched, which might be helpful.
https://www.xlmoto.co.uk/mc-parts/c...s-415-630_c155/rk-415hsb-chain_pid-PM-4907102
Quote: "All 415H chains are pre-stressed and pre-stretched for superior performance and to minimise lengthening of the chain during its life."
 
OP
GuyBoden

GuyBoden

Veteran
Location
Warrington
The chain stretch tools are for derailleur equipped bikes from what I can see.
Well, maybe, due to the roller diameter being 5/16" for 1/8" single speed chains and 3/16" for 3/32" derailleur chains, the chain checker tool wouldn't be as accurate, maybe out by 2/16", but that's still good enough for me.:okay:
 
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