Orbea Gain

arao99

Active Member
Location
Wolverhampton
As soon as a dealer or a new owner connects to the gain the original owner will get an email with coordinates to show where the bike is ,as I found out when my dealer connect his app to my bike last week.
 

G3CWI

Veteran
Location
Macclesfield
A quick update. A few weeks in and several hundred miles on the M21i.

The good bits: it does encourage me to tackle more hilly rides. It's a lot of fun to ride. On even moderately technical gravel the speed restriction is not a problem. It pedals well on the road without assistance if needed.

The bad bits: power delivery up very steep hills is poor. The cover for the charging point is completely inadequate - it's always full of water when I get home. Despite the advertising; it has no mudguard mounts.

I bought it to allow me to tackle hilly stuff from my motorhome where (due to the size of the vehicle) I can't park close to the riding area. It does that perfectly.
 

Scaleyback

Well-Known Member
Location
North Yorkshire
A quick update. A few weeks in and several hundred miles on the M21i.
The bad bits: power delivery up very steep hills is poor. The cover for the charging point is completely inadequate - it's always full of water when I get home. Despite the advertising; it has no mudguard mounts.
My take on a couple of the points you make.
The power delivery on steep hills ? I am 72 and have no complaints. This must be a subjective thing, more about the particular rider than the bikes power delivery. Remember Orbea say “ it enhances your ride, doesn’t dominate it”
I do not ride in wet weather (given the choice), the rare times I have been caught I have never found water in the charging point.
However, I have full mudguards that do help keep water spray negligible.
Mudguard mounts on carbon frames ? I don’t think they exist on any makers bikes. Orbea should stress the point in their marketing literature,
Alloy frames only with mudguards mounts.
Enjoy your Gain.
 

Storck

Active Member
Location
UK
My take on a couple of the points you make.
The power delivery on steep hills ? I am 72 and have no complaints. This must be a subjective thing, more about the particular rider than the bikes power delivery. Remember Orbea say “ it enhances your ride, doesn’t dominate it”
I do not ride in wet weather (given the choice), the rare times I have been caught I have never found water in the charging point.
However, I have full mudguards that do help keep water spray negligible.
Mudguard mounts on carbon frames ? I don’t think they exist on any makers bikes. Orbea should stress the point in their marketing literature,
Alloy frames only with mudguards mounts.
Enjoy your Gain.
Agree with most you say Scaley, as they mirror my Gain experiences. Ps. You can get carbon frames that have guard fittings. My own Trek Domane has them (one reason why I choose it as a winter build) they are not obvious too. Discreetly hidden on the inside of the front and rear stays. Take the guards off and you wouldn't know they where there.
 

Southernguns

Active Member
Location
Uk
A quick update. A few weeks in and several hundred miles on the M21i...
... Despite the advertising; it has no mudguard mounts.
I could be wrong and will happily stand corrected but I do not think Orbea advertise mudguard mounts on their Gain (M series) carbon frames, only on their (D and F series) alloy frames. They definitely have them on my D30, although I do not make use of them.

I certainly agree with G3CWI in that it is more fun to ride, especially on hillier rides. And it does make you more willing to tackle hilly rides. My personal experiences are somewhat similar but, at the same time, a little different (if that makes any sense). I have found my technique on hills really effects how well the bike delivers its power, and as my technique is far from good I also experience varying performances in power delivery. However, I am certain that this is down to me as a poor rider because when I really focus on a good, smooth spinning technique the performance is pretty consistent. If I try and grind a big gear up the hills, or my spinning is far from smooth, then the performance from the bike is very varied. My biggest grip however, and it is nothing to do with the bike but more to do with my cycling ability and the limiting of speed to 15.5mph, is that as soon as my mates travel over over 16 mph on flat or slightly uphill terrain I struggle to stay anywhere near them and fall further and further back until we reach the next hill. I would be keen to try the US version with the higher speed restriction.
 

Storck

Active Member
Location
UK
I could be wrong and will happily stand corrected but I do not think Orbea advertise mudguard mounts on their Gain (M series) carbon frames, only on their (D and F series) alloy frames. They definitely have them on my D30, although I do not make use of them.

I certainly agree with G3CWI in that it is more fun to ride, especially on hillier rides. And it does make you more willing to tackle hilly rides. My personal experiences are somewhat similar but, at the same time, a little different (if that makes any sense). I have found my technique on hills really effects how well the bike delivers its power, and as my technique is far from good I also experience varying performances in power delivery. However, I am certain that this is down to me as a poor rider because when I really focus on a good, smooth spinning technique the performance is pretty consistent. If I try and grind a big gear up the hills, or my spinning is far from smooth, then the performance from the bike is very varied. My biggest grip however, and it is nothing to do with the bike but more to do with my cycling ability and the limiting of speed to 15.5mph, is that as soon as my mates travel over over 16 mph on flat or slightly uphill terrain I struggle to stay anywhere near them and fall further and further back until we reach the next hill. I would be keen to try the US version with the higher speed restriction.
You're so right about the correct approach to climbing hills on the Gain. For max and smooth progress from the assist, sitting down and keeping the revs between 75/80 rpm gets the best out of the "engine"
 

G3CWI

Veteran
Location
Macclesfield
You're so right about the correct approach to climbing hills on the Gain. For max and smooth progress from the assist, sitting down and keeping the revs between 75/80 rpm gets the best out of the "engine"

I agree. However some of the ascents here are 20% plus and even with the gearing on the M21 I cannot keep the cadence high enough. I’m not hugely bothered as I can cycle up them anyway. Probably it’s a downside of hubdrives. The power kicks in as the gradient eases and I can recover.
 
OP
youngoldbloke

youngoldbloke

The older I get, the faster I used to be ...
Yes are probably right. However some UK resellers said the M series had mounts - sloppy cut and paste perhaps?). It does on the fork (a shared component) but not on the frame.
P clips on the seat stays?
 
OP
youngoldbloke

youngoldbloke

The older I get, the faster I used to be ...
I agree. However some of the ascents here are 20% plus and even with the gearing on the M21 I cannot keep the cadence high enough. I’m not hugely bothered as I can cycle up them anyway. Probably it’s a downside of hubdrives. The power kicks in as the gradient eases and I can recover.
34T cassette?
 

Smudge

Über Member
Location
Somerset
I agree. However some of the ascents here are 20% plus and even with the gearing on the M21 I cannot keep the cadence high enough. I’m not hugely bothered as I can cycle up them anyway. Probably it’s a downside of hubdrives. The power kicks in as the gradient eases and I can recover.
The problem on steep hills with the Gain, is more down to motor torque than how high you can get the cadence. 40nm is just not enough grunt in the motor.
 
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