Ready to start!

OP
LibraRider

LibraRider

Active Member
@LibraRider

If you're willing to post a picture if yourself sat on your racer with this leg and hand position (see image). We can collectively see if the bike and or your position is compromised

You could blur the image View attachment 504490
Haha - I will do my best. But I certainly don’t look like that :laugh:

if that’s the positioning that I’m supposed to have - then there is definitely something not right

I’ll try get one took tomorrow
 

I like Skol

I'm Jay-walking, and I love it...
But I certainly don’t look like that :laugh:
It's ok, neither do we......
 
I have been looking at the microshift shifters. Which ones do you have if you don’t mind?

I just can’t see past the £50+ each!
I have the short reach version of the R8 shifters i.e. SB-R482(S) on my road bike, but then I'm only 4ft 11 and have very small hands. :blush:

https://www.microshift.com/en/product/sb-r482/

If you shop around, they can be had cheaper than £100 for a set.
 

12boy

Über Member
Location
Casper WY USA
All my bikes are semi flat bar insofar as they have either moustache, North Road or Milan bars flipped for that path racer vibe. Even my Brompton. I've tried flats, risers, bar ends, drops and bullhorns and I ride further with less discomfort with the bars I use. But, hey, we are all different.
 

CXRAndy

Guru
Location
Lincs
Haha - I will do my best. But I certainly don’t look like that :laugh:

if that’s the positioning that I’m supposed to have - then there is definitely something not right

I’ll try get one took tomorrow
Approximately, yes that is the correct position.

Seat height so your leg is nearly straight at the bottom of the pedal stroke.

Arm position, slightly bent elbows when riding on the hoods, which is mainly where you will ride.

Back position, in that region, this all depends on individual flexibility and core strength. Some folk can lean further forward and others need a more upright position.
 

BigMeatball

Well-Known Member
tempted to flog it and buy a womens bike now 😞 very disappointed
my guess is that womens bikes will have the same shifters/brake levers than the mens model. They're probably different for high level bikes but for entry level they're probably the same because that's how they keep the price down, using same standardised components.

But yeah, go to the guys in Birmingham. 5 minutes with them are worth more than wasting hours reading comments from a bunch of newbies like us here on the forum :laugh:
 
Last edited:

nickAKA

Senior Member
Location
Manchester
I have been looking at the microshift shifters. Which ones do you have if you don’t mind?

I just can’t see past the £50+ each!

I only spent £150 on the bike!

tempted to flog it and buy a womens bike now 😞 very disappointed
I have no idea what your local (?) bike shop is like (bike foundry?) but if it's anything like mine (John's bikes, round the corner from work FYI :okay:) I'm sure they'll have some more suitable used levers knocking about in the spares box that they'll be happy to repurpose for you. John's place looks like a junk shop, but he does a brilliant job for not much money at all and prefers using the stuff he's hoarded. He'd probably swap a pair of levers part-ex and just charge for fitting.
Extreme example, he swapped the frameset on the wife's bike for me last year - brand new unused framset supplied by him (he had it in the cellar, nothing particularly special but the right size and better than the one it replaced)... had to swap the calipers to long drops, swapped the drivetrain over - total bill was £150. I was struggling to find a reasonable frame for that price on ebay.
 
Thanks for this.
I have contacted them and am going to take it in maybe Saturday afternoon to see what they think.
If you don't get on there (I hope you will - they are great people), then go on to Ben at Venture Bikes behind Printigo, just up the road towards town (can't miss Printigo - big and bright just before Stirchley Baths community centre).
Both are quiet and unassuming people. Listen and chat.

Part of the problem is that everying is new, and it will take a while to get used to a new bike and position. The road bike geometry is very different to what you are used to, and anything that puts your body into an unusual position will be uncomfortable for a while. It might take a few rides to nail down what the problem is, and what can be done to solve it. At the moment you are in a position where any changes you make will improve things, but what is down to the changes and what is down to your body adjusting is a bit of a mystery. Classic one is the saddle. Your bum will adjust in time to what is fitted. If you get a wonderful new saddle now, and fit an Aldi Gel pad to it, it will be so much better than the last one. But maybe not as good as the last one would have been anyway had you kept it on. On the other hand, being a woman, if you are trying to get comfortable on a men's saddle, it will never fit you well.

In 2011 I started running. Went to a specialist shop, ran on a treadmill, and was prescribed shoes with a bit of support on the inside. Two weeks ago they started to come apart, so bought a new pair. Again, specialist shop, ran on a treadmill - completely different diagnosis, and I am now neutral. Why? I think my body adjusted shortly after I started running, but after I had bought the shoes.

Got your pack for Ride the Reservoir yet?
 
Last edited:
I’m spending a lot of time (and distance) on my Hybrid at the moment, there’s nothing wrong with sticking with a hybrid ( even for the event ). The drop bar bikes are different in feel to start with, because they are all about positioning, and the positions you can hold on a drop bar, are really quite different to the positions you hold on an upright hybrid. The muscles are worked differently, and different muscles start to be worked on a drop bar bike. You can feel like you’ve put a load more effort in, and gone slower. You probably have, because of the inefficiency that has manifested itself, when you changed to a drop bar bike. Add in the thinner tyres, and you could feel quite beaten up after your first couple of drop bar bike efforts. Stick at it, it does get more comfy with time, as your body adjusts to the demands being put on it.
 
Top Bottom