Stick with tubeless?

Discussion in 'General Cycling Discussions' started by Slipperdiff, 3 Jul 2019.

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  1. Pedropete

    Pedropete Über Member

    Location:
    West Sussex, UK
    Assuming the rims are tubeless compatible too, check that they're taped properly and give tubeless a go. Just use a decent sealant and remember to top it up! How often will depend on which sealant; Stan's is notorious for drying out quickly, Schwalbe Doc Blue is just rebadged Stan's, Finish Line is over priced snake oil and Magic Milk seems to vary by batch.

    I've had best results with Orange Seal Endurance, which lasts so long I got a bit slack this year and forgot to check the level in the Spring. Meaning that when I managed to burp my rear tyre on a pothole last week and break the seal, it went down fast and wouldn't re-seal as there was no liquid sealant left in the tyre, because I'm a muppet. Nothing an emergency tube didn't sort, briefly, before the valve stem cracked at the base and I had a sweary three mile trudge to the LBS for a replacement, because the tube was old and buggered and, again, I'm a muppet.

    All you'll need to carry in addition to your normal repair kit and spare tubes is a tubeless plug kit and insertion tool (super cheap and tiny) and a tyre boot if you don't already carry one. If the damage is too much for decent sealant to fix there's a good chance it'll need booting before you put a tube in anyway.
     
    Last edited: 6 Jul 2019
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  2. MrGrumpy

    MrGrumpy Huge Member

    Location:
    Fly Fifer
    Been riding tubeless for a month now, and this week I've had two punctures front and rear, both would not seal properly. So still experimenting with this, might not have been enough sealant ( holes were not that big ) or not very good sealant ( bought from Decathlon ). Looks also like I best buy some plugs and tyre boot as well. Have to say if I can sort this out, the tubeless tyres do roll very well, even the gravel type I'm running just now are pretty fast rolling on all surfaces.
     
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  3. SkipdiverJohn

    SkipdiverJohn Über Member

    Location:
    London
    I'd buy some inner tubes and fit those instead if I were you.
     
  4. Afnug

    Afnug I'll Sithee

    I am always interested in what sealant people use, I have used Stans mostly, I did try some Peaty but found it too bitty, it tended to clog the valve, I am currently trying some Effetto, I will also have to try some Orange Seal Endurance which seems to have a long life, I tend to forget to top up.

    Rim tape also is of interest, the first tubeless I fitted I used a 20" tube split lengthwise on non tubeless rims, it worked great, I have since used Stans and the same stuff as Stans but much cheaper on a big roll off eBay, the worst I have used is Gorilla tape, it does the job and seals well, but getting it off the rim is a PITA.
     
    Last edited: 6 Jul 2019
    Pedropete likes this.
  5. MrGrumpy

    MrGrumpy Huge Member

    Location:
    Fly Fifer
    Because you never get punctures with inner tubes :-)
     
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  6. jiberjaber

    jiberjaber Über Member

    Location:
    Essex
    Give this a read through, seems to be one of the most comprehensive collections of Tubeless info I've come across to date. https://thecycleclinic.co.uk/pages/tech-page

    Effetto sealant for me and tyre worms. The times I've had to use an inner tube have all been because I had no sealant left in the tyre - an oversight on my behalf. With the exception of my Brompton, all my bikes are tubeless. Its very enjoyable to run tyres a good 30psi lower than you might be used to over long distances.

    Give it a go, expect it to be a bit different to the usual inner tube approach, so don't let any initial learning experiences put you off but if you decide you want to go back to tubes - well no harm in trying tubeless!

    One thing I would say - if you don't ride very often then tubeless might not be for you (i.e. you have a bike hanging up for a month or so and then go for a ride...) as it possible would be easy to forget how long it was since last topped up with sealant and any long time not ridden may result in lost air which in the extreme might also result in the tyre becoming unseated and accelerating the sealant drying out. Mine usually deflate to around 30psi and sit there, the rim usually stays on the rim as teh sealant inside does a good job of gluing it there - but that's just my experience.
     
  7. Pedropete

    Pedropete Über Member

    Location:
    West Sussex, UK
    I think Peaty's is intended more for MTB use, i.e. much higher volume and lower pressure, hence the bigger particles. I did try some Effetto when the LBS had it on offer and found that while it sealed okayish it didn't last long at all, so keep an eye on the level!

    Yep, took me the best part of an afternoon to clean the rims after I used gorilla tape! The ebay Tessa tape option is definitely the most cost effective option.
     
    Afnug likes this.
  8. lane

    lane Über Member

    Put my tubeless on in Feb I think. Put stans race sealent in because had read it was the best. Then read it drys out more quickly and can't put through the valve. Had a look the other day by breaking the seal - so got to be four months on - and not dried out at all that I could see. Put a bit more in anyway - took about 5 mins. Left the back tyre because seemed like it would also be ok for a while. Can't report on puncture effectiveness as don't seem to have had one but is rated highly - and is expensive.

    Tip - when parking bike turn wheel so valve is at top should stop problems with the valve gumming.
     
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  9. Justinitus

    Justinitus Someone mention cake??

    Location:
    Wiltshire
    I’ve just got my first tubeless bike (Giant Revolt) and I’m running 700x38c Hutchinson Overides. Still experimenting with pressures - currently 60psi rear and 45psi front. What pressures are you running out of interest? (Assuming similar size tyre!)
     
  10. Afnug

    Afnug I'll Sithee

    700 x 38 Schwalbe G One Allround, actually measure 40 when fitted. 45 psi rear 40 psi front.
     
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  11. Justinitus

    Justinitus Someone mention cake??

    Location:
    Wiltshire
    Mine come up at 39mm. I’m 98kg (15.4 stone) riding mainly poorly surfaced roads and bridleways. Do you think I should drop the psi?
     
  12. Afnug

    Afnug I'll Sithee

    I weigh about 12.5 stone so may get away with lower pressure than you, it depends what it feels like when riding, you can always lower it and see how it feels.
     
    Justinitus likes this.
  13. bladesman73

    bladesman73 Senior Member

    Whats is the point of tubeless on race bikes unless you are racing? I dont care about a bit less rolling resistance and that I can ride using lower tyre pressures I do care about messing up my wheels with sealant that splurges all over the place on occasion. Funny thing is the ones I know who are tubeless always carry a tube with them. Just give it up!
     
  14. Dogtrousers

    Dogtrousers Kilometre nibbler

    Typically racers use tubular tyres, not tubeless. A whole different kettle of fish.
     
  15. bladesman73

    bladesman73 Senior Member

    Yep. The pros use tubulars. Dont understand the need for tubeless. Too much of a faff.
     
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