Ultimate Commuter

I like Skol

Hold my beer and watch this....
Maybe you are over thinking things a bit too much? Mid-range shimano stuff is solid and reliable even with hardly any maintenance. My traditional derailleur gears work flawlessly on year round commuting despite seldom cleaning and minimal maintenance. Just get something with Deore or Tiagra gears and it's job done.
Spyre disc brakes are awesome.
 

simongt

Über Member
Location
Norwich
rubber drive belt
I was in a branch of Cycle Republic recently and a fitter type lad had a belt drive bike on the stand; he appeared to be doing a pre delivery check. I asked him how the belt came off when it needed changing. He obviously wasn't too sure, as he had to study the rear triangle to decide which bits came apart to facilitate the change. That's a bit worrying - ! :whistle:
 

Cycleops

Guru
Location
Accra, Ghana
I was in a branch of Cycle Republic recently and a fitter type lad had a belt drive bike on the stand; he appeared to be doing a pre delivery check. I asked him how the belt came off when it needed changing. He obviously wasn't too sure, as he had to study the rear triangle to decide which bits came apart to facilitate the change. That's a bit worrying - ! :whistle:
All he would have needed to do is check YouTube, looks simple enough;

View: https://youtu.be/MPoKawd1y9M
 
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SuperHans123

Formerly known as snertos999
Few pics of the Cannondale Treadwell 2 I picked up yesterday.
With added DMR Vault Pedals and SKS mudguards.
 

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SkipdiverJohn

Veteran
Location
London
Don't need to bother lubing, no crud was my logic.
Most station bikes I see parked up around London obviously never see the attentions of an oil can - irrespective of how many gears they have at the back! They make my hack bikes look like Rolls Royces, and I'm frankly surprised a lot of them actually work at all...
 

SuperHans123

Formerly known as snertos999
Please post a report on the Treadwell @SuperHans123 . I'd be very interested to know what you think of it, especially the sensor link.
Pretty much the perfect town bike I'd have thought.
Went for my 1st proper ride today on the Treadwell. (14.5 mile round trip to the pier), so can provide a quick summary.
  • The bike rolls remarkably well given the fact it has large tyres
  • It rides beautifully
  • The brakes are excellent
  • The 9 speed Advent MicroShift gears, whilst being budget, change very confidently
  • Looking over the front of the bike, because of the bars and thick tyre, it reminds me of my BMX riding days (Which is a good thing IMO)
  • The saddle, whilst looking comfortable, may take a couple of adjustments until it feels ok but I have sat on way way worse
  • The grips are awful. They are called 'Comfort' but they are not. There is a bulge where the middle of the hand sits and I just kept wanting to move my hand. (Ordered some Giant Ergo Max grips with bar ends to replace)
  • Feels 'quicker' than my last hybrid, which is also a Cannondale (Quick Disc 4) Took me dead on 30 minutes to do the 7.1 mile ride from my house to the pier, which for me, is pretty sharp!
The main thing though was the bike felt great and I thoroughly enjoyed the ride, if that equals what 'fun' is, then it was fun!
 

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Cycleops

Guru
Location
Accra, Ghana
That's very interesting, thanks for posting. So all their research hasn't been for nothing then.
Looking at the sort of terrain you're using it over I should think it's ideal.
Many more happy riding days.
 

SuperHans123

Formerly known as snertos999
That's very interesting, thanks for posting. So all their research hasn't been for nothing then.
Looking at the sort of terrain you're using it over I should think it's ideal.
Many more happy riding days.
Seems as if they got quite a few things right.
Looking forward to going out on it tomorrow
 

KneesUp

Veteran
Any decent old "mountain bike" or "hybrid" will do the job - preferably steel. You can get them for not much money in all the usual places. They do all you need, and don't attract unwanted attention. I used to commute in South Manchester and yeah, you don't need many gears. But be aware that a good sturdy, reliable commuter will also be a good, sturdy reliable touring bike too, so don't shy away from more gears than you 'need' - I keep being tempted to get one of the SA 3 speed hubs that will also take a cassette - 8 speed are cheap enough, and that would give you plenty of gear range.

I am also a fan of maintenance-free (basically) drum brakes too.
 
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