How do you mount and dismount your bike?

grldtnr

Well-Known Member
The method I use for a diamond framed bike.
Stand level with the handlebars, facing forwards, feet together, right hand holding the stem, swing the right leg forwards and up, letting go with the right hand and taking hold with the left then both hands as necessary, find the pedal with your right foot, push the bike forwards slightly until it is in the right position for sitting on the saddle and away you go. With practice this is all done in one fluid graceful movement, easier to do than describe.
You of course are standing to the left of the bike, otherwise you end up sitting bon the 'bars & holding the saddle:stop:
 

grldtnr

Well-Known Member
You of course are standing to the left of the bike, otherwise you end up sitting bon the 'bars & holding the saddle:stop:
....and if on the recumbent trike, I have a little side table, cuppa ,a few slices of buttered toast , and the morning paper to read before I set of.
None of this wobbling about malarkey......might even watch a bit of telly whilst the tea cools down, put the remote down ,sunnies on then cruise of over the horizon:okay:.
 

Dogtrousers

Kilometre nibbler
Clearly a job for a bit of AI text generation. ( Write With Transformer (huggingface.co) )

Instructions for how to mount a bicycle: First, the bicycle must be in good condition and be not too tight or difficult to tighten. If you are using a rear derailleur, remove your chain and tighten the front derailleur slightly. This will make it easier to mount your pedals. Second, the front of the bicycle must have enough room for your saddle and your shoes, especially if you are going to ride for a long time. I suggest that the saddle be about two feet from the ground so that you can sit with it straight back up and your feet on the ground , not resting on your knees. Third, the bicycle's frame must be at least as long as your upper body is wide and you need it to stay steady and comfortable . A bicycle frame with a large bottom bracket is recommended as it is very hard to keep your upper body at right angles to the ground.
 

Biker man

Well-Known Member
Clearly a job for a bit of AI text generation. ( Write With Transformer (huggingface.co) )

Instructions for how to mount a bicycle: First, the bicycle must be in good condition and be not too tight or difficult to tighten. If you are using a rear derailleur, remove your chain and tighten the front derailleur slightly. This will make it easier to mount your pedals. Second, the front of the bicycle must have enough room for your saddle and your shoes, especially if you are going to ride for a long time. I suggest that the saddle be about two feet from the ground so that you can sit with it straight back up and your feet on the ground , not resting on your knees. Third, the bicycle's frame must be at least as long as your upper body is wide and you need it to stay steady and comfortable . A bicycle frame with a large bottom bracket is recommended as it is very hard to keep your upper body at right angles to the ground.
What about a penny farthing how do you mount it 🤠
 

grldtnr

Well-Known Member
Clearly a job for a bit of AI text generation. ( Write With Transformer (huggingface.co) )

Instructions for how to mount a bicycle: First, the bicycle must be in good condition and be not too tight or difficult to tighten. If you are using a rear derailleur, remove your chain and tighten the front derailleur slightly. This will make it easier to mount your pedals. Second, the front of the bicycle must have enough room for your saddle and your shoes, especially if you are going to ride for a long time. I suggest that the saddle be about two feet from the ground so that you can sit with it straight back up and your feet on the ground , not resting on your knees. Third, the bicycle's frame must be at least as long as your upper body is wide and you need it to stay steady and comfortable . A bicycle frame with a large bottom bracket is recommended as it is very hard to keep your upper body at right angles to the ground.
Poorly translated "Chinglish" evidently.
 

grldtnr

Well-Known Member
Anyone who mounts from the right is an outcast, a pariah, not someone I would admit to knowing, has probably stolen the bike and in all probability is a tormentor of baby monkeys.
I ride a recumbent , so comfy with that!
Anycase ,I don't know you, so that's ok.
Bike is'nt stolen, and yes maybe I have teased the odd primate, but normally they are behind the wheel of a humongous 4x4, emitting a lot of dB of ear noise, again ,I 'm ok with that!
 

Biker man

Well-Known Member
I ride a recumbent , so comfy with that!
Anycase ,I don't know you, so that's ok.
Bike is'nt stolen, and yes maybe I have teased the odd primate, but normally they are behind the wheel of a humongous 4x4, emitting a lot of dB of ear noise, again ,I 'm ok with that!
Could be just left handed
 
 

raleighnut

Legendary Member
The method I use for a diamond framed bike.
Stand level with the handlebars, facing forwards, feet together, right hand holding the stem, swing the right leg forwards and up, letting go with the right hand and taking hold with the left then both hands as necessary, find the pedal with your right foot, push the bike forwards slightly until it is in the right position for sitting on the saddle and away you go. With practice this is all done in one fluid graceful movement, easier to do than describe.
Didn't you used to be a contortionist or was that @satnavsaystraighton :whistle:
 

fossyant

Ride It Like You Stole It!
Location
South Manchester
My hip joints are a bit delicate so I lower my bike slightly to the left and swing my right leg over the saddle. I then clip the right foot in, push off with that, and freewheel until I get my left foot clipped in. If I am starting off on a steep uphill and I can't get started any other way, I would hang on to a wall/fence/post/whatever and clip both feet in before setting off.
Similar here, although it's my back that get's tired more. That's why dropper posts are excellent on MTB's, especially when you can't get yer leg over.
 

grldtnr

Well-Known Member
:laugh::rolleyes::tongue::wacko::okay:
Best method with a fixed is to hold the bike carefully on your right hand side
position hands carefully on the bars

then lean it against a wall, get the proper bike out and ride that instead
:eek:
Best method with a fixed is to hold the bike carefully on your right hand side
position hands carefully on the bars

then lean it against a wall, get the proper bike out and ride that instead
:eek:
 
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