Cleat positioning jig / tool

screenman

Legendary Member
No but I look forward to the outcome. Did they take the position standing or seated.
 

screenman

Legendary Member
I thought so, but for many people the foot us at a different angle when seated. Only a few rides will find out, did they move them much from your original position.
 
OP
Cuchilo

Cuchilo

Prize winning member X2
Location
London
I thought so, but for many people the foot us at a different angle when seated. Only a few rides will find out, did they move them much from your original position.
Your foot is placed into the jig first and they take measurements , its the size and shape of the foot they need so i guess it doesnt matter what position you are in . This is then transferred over to the shoe .
Did about 30 miles today but on the road bike , most of my riding this year has been on the TT bike . Position felt fine but they had not moved the cleats very far from where i had them .
 

screenman

Legendary Member
Your foot is placed into the jig first and they take measurements , its the size and shape of the foot they need so i guess it doesnt matter what position you are in . This is then transferred over to the shoe .
Did about 30 miles today but on the road bike , most of my riding this year has been on the TT bike . Position felt fine but they had not moved the cleats very far from where i had them .
So they do not measure for toe in or out, seems odd.
 
U

User6179

Guest
toe in or out of what ? They measure your foot :huh:

pigeon-toes.jpg
 

Slioch

Guru
Location
York
I used the "sit on a table" method for setting my cleats when I first started using them.

What became apparent in practice though was that my feet weren't identical, as my left foot felt 100% ok, but my right foot developed a hotspot. Through a lot of experimental tweaking I found that my ideal was for the cleat position on the right foot to be set half a centimetre further towards the heel than the left foot.

So from my perspective using electronic wizardry in your LBS may be ok as a starting point, but to get the perfect position you still need to listen to what your feet are telling you and not be afraid to do a bit of manual tweaking.
 
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