Hybrid or road bike .

Jon tur

Member
I'm now totaly confused which type I should go for . I'm a pleasure rider riding to keep fit . At the moment I have a mountain bike . 20 Years old . I want to have a rear pannier for one bag maybe 2 . I didn't want drop bars Incase I spend a fortune on a bike and can't get used to them . And I heard riding position is bent over . At 46 I don't wanna get a bad back . But is a hybrid good for speed like a road bike ? Which is safer for me ? Best brakes etc . I'm no speed demon and never gonna go 60 miles a trip . Most I've done in one trip is 30 miles so far .
So I want a bike for max 30 miles in comfort ,with a pannier fitted ,good brakes and gears ,light and one I can get speed on safely . So hybrid or road ?
 

ANT 666

Trying to re member
Location
N.Wales
If you are only doing about 30 miles a hybrid is probably good just make sure it has road tyres not any sort of knobblies as these are the buggers that slow you down.
 

vickster

Legendary Member
If you aren't keen on drop bars, go flat bar. Although if never used, go get a decent test ride of a road bike, checking it has the lugs for a rack, or can take one with p clips, plus clearance for mudguards

There are plenty of fast hybrids out there, disc brakes are good if going to be riding in all weathers and in heavy traffic where stopping quickly is needed.

A well set up bike that is the right size shouldn't give you back ache...that said a badly set up bike that is the wrong size can do so regardless of what type it is, hybrid or road

What's your budget?

Someone linked this on another thread, looks very good for the money (assuming you have £600)

http://www.planetx.co.uk/i/q/CBPXLDNRDTIAFB/planet-x-london-road-argento-tiagra-flat-bar-bike

Or something like this but no discs, carbon fork is great on rough roads

http://www.tredz.co.uk/.Giant-Escape-1-2015-Hybrid-Sports-Bike_73825.htm

Personally, I like Whyte bikes :smile: I have a 2012 Cambridge

Ergo grips are IMO more comfortable than round ones and a cheap change
 

MikeW-71

Veteran
Location
Carlisle
An alternative to that but with drop bars is the Giant Revolt. Disc brakes, can take a rack and fatter tyres, though it costs a little more
 

vickster

Legendary Member
Here's a few links to some Whytes, discs (in the absence of budget), pannier mounts, mudguard capable (Whyte sell their own). You might find last year's models cheaper (or go speak to your local friendly Whyte dealer)

http://www.edinburghbicycle.com/products/whyte-sussex-15
http://www.edinburghbicycle.com/products/whyte-whitechapel-15
http://www.edinburghbicycle.com/products/whyte-shoreditch-15

http://www.discountcyclesdirect.co....='Whyte Portobello 2013 Hybrid/Commuter Bike'

http://www.discountcyclesdirect.co.uk/catalog/product.php?CI_ID=12322 I've one of these but you'd need to be quite tall for this bargain one

Could you really ride a bike called the Revolt :ph34r:
 

Cyclist33

Guest
Location
Warrington
Here's a few links to some Whytes, discs (in the absence of budget), pannier mounts, mudguard capable (Whyte sell their own). You might find last year's models cheaper (or go speak to your local friendly Whyte dealer)

http://www.edinburghbicycle.com/products/whyte-sussex-15
http://www.edinburghbicycle.com/products/whyte-whitechapel-15
http://www.edinburghbicycle.com/products/whyte-shoreditch-15

http://www.discountcyclesdirect.co.uk/catalog/product.php?CI_ID=14059&Item='Whyte Portobello 2013 Hybrid/Commuter Bike'

http://www.discountcyclesdirect.co.uk/catalog/product.php?CI_ID=12322 I've one of these but you'd need to be quite tall for this bargain one

Could you really ride a bike called the Revolt :ph34r:
No less weird a name than the Whyte Whitechapel, to be frank.
 

vickster

Legendary Member
Whyte name all their road and hybrid bikes after counties or places in London/UK., seems sensible for a UK company

To Revolt, Revolt(ing)...?? Is it black :whistle: ?
 

Darren Gregory

Rides a Pinnacle Arkose 3 and a Trek Emonda SL6
Having had a partial discectomy of my spine and having never ridden a drop bar bike I too was apprehensive. I looked at bikes which did not have a "too agressive" geometry. I have been riding it since last Autumn of rides anywhere between 5k and 30k with no problems with my back at all. I dont spend a lot of time in the drops but I am using them more particularly on descents.

I really appreciate that with drop bars you get multiple hand positions so you can mix it up on long rides.

No one on here can be certain that you will or will not like drop bars, give some a try and try to get a bike fitting see how you get on.

Good luck
 

Eagone

Well-Known Member
Hi
I started riding this (see link) in November 13.
Its a fab machine, not quite as fast as a drop bar bike but I think that's down to me rather than the bike.
It has pannier fitting space and the 105 mech which is dead smooth.
I start riding 30k rides but I've done a number of 80k sportives on it.
Love it - The link will take you to last years model, but would recommend it if its available this year.

http://www.evanscycles.com/products/specialized/sirrus-comp-disc-2014-hybrid-bike-ec053139
 

Dave7

Legendary Member
Location
Cheshire
Sorry if I'm missing something but I cant see that you have said what type of cycling you want to do i.e. road only/canal paths/off road?
Re' your bad back..........frame geometry is very important. I have just purchased a 'drop bar' and I am 68 with a gammy back :smile:...I went for a "sportive" style which is more relaxed as it is shorter reach & more upright than traditional "racing" type bikes. I never use the "drop" position but it does give you as many positional options as straight bars.
Drop bar road bikes do tend to have narrow tyres which require high pressure and can feel unforgiving and are no good for anything BUT the road.
Hybrids. With full sized wheels.........tyres between, say, 25-40mm and half decent gears..........you will find speed no problem and get comfort.
As others have said......Whyte do some lovely hybrid type bikes. Giant have just brought out a nice range of hybrids at a decent price.
 

Cyclist33

Guest
Location
Warrington
Sorry if I'm missing something but I cant see that you have said what type of cycling you want to do i.e. road only/canal paths/off road?
Re' your bad back..........frame geometry is very important. I have just purchased a 'drop bar' and I am 68 with a gammy back :smile:...I went for a "sportive" style which is more relaxed as it is shorter reach & more upright than traditional "racing" type bikes. I never use the "drop" position but it does give you as many positional options as straight bars.
Drop bar road bikes do tend to have narrow tyres which require high pressure and can feel unforgiving and are no good for anything BUT the road.
Hybrids. With full sized wheels.........tyres between, say, 25-40mm and half decent gears..........you will find speed no problem and get comfort.
As others have said......Whyte do some lovely hybrid type bikes. Giant have just brought out a nice range of hybrids at a decent price.
agreed, you can always put road tyres on a hybrid but you cant always put hybrid tyres on a road bike.


should also be noted that one position you do lose with drop bars is the wide open chest position, as typically a drop bar will be 44 cm wide or less whereas flat bars are usually at least 56 cm wide.
 
I think you'd get used to a drop bar bike and you dont have to ride on the drops. That aside a flat bar road bike is one that ticks the box, like the specialized sirrus or giant rapide; some folk call them a hybrid. Flat bar roadbikes are almost as fast as a dropbar roadbike but a more upright position, better brakes and mounts for a rack/guards :okay:
 
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