Mountain bike with road bike gearing

NickTB

Veteran
Hello all,
I’ve bought myself a Marin Gestalt one by gravel bike a few months back and I’ve finally realised my back just isn’t up to the geometry. I’m thinking of getting a mountain bike for the relaxed riding position but don’t want to be spinning out on my frequent road trips.
Can anyone suggest something that’s close to road gearing but has a more upright position?
TIA
Nick
 

Cycleops

Legendary Member
Location
Accra, Ghana
I don’t think you’re going to be happy with a mountain bike on the road, even with road gearing. It’ll feel like a real donkey compared to the Gestalt.
A little tinker with the position on your gravel bike should find you a much more upright position. I should start with flipped the stem, if that’s not enough get a new stem with more rise in it.
Give it a go, I think you’ll be surprised.
 

Darius_Jedburgh

Looking for the lost chord.
Frame geometry will be a major problem. Angles etc are different on a road bike. You won't need any suspension. You will need much narrower tyres and preferably different size rims.
Too many major differences between mtb and road bikes for long term use.
 

Cycleops

Legendary Member
Location
Accra, Ghana
If the above doesn't work, what about a hybrid - with appropriate tyres that's basically a flat bar road bike, and they range from racy to relaxed geometries.
That’s basically what he’s got so instead of getting a new bike why not put flat bars and trigger shifters on the Marin? Trouble is he’s back to square one with the position, nearly the same as with a hybrid.
 

SkipdiverJohn

Veteran
Location
London
Upright bikes need to be lower geared than drop bar ones for the simple reason they generate more aerodynamic drag for any given road speed. Therefore you are going to either end up riding slower, or putting in more effort. People generally have a consistent comfortable workrate, so if the drag goes up the road speed must come down, along with the gearing to maintain a similar cadence.
 
Location
London
If the above doesn't work, what about a hybrid - with appropriate tyres that's basically a flat bar road bike, and they range from racy to relaxed geometries.
sh - the bike industry doesn't like you to use that tainted-with-downmarket term - they're worried that they won't be able to flog you some special-purpose-invented-yesterday-after-a-lightening-flash of-inspiration bike at an inflated price.
 
Location
London
Upright bikes need to be lower geared than drop bar ones for the simple reason they generate more aerodynamic drag for any given road speed. Therefore you are going to either end up riding slower, or putting in more effort. People generally have a consistent comfortable workrate, so if the drag goes up the road speed must come down, along with the gearing to maintain a similar cadence.
interesting view but is that really the case? I have the idea that many folk with drops don't spend that much time on the drops, as they are wont to quickly say if anyone suggests that they find drops awkward.
 

fossyant

Ride It Like You Stole It!
Location
South Manchester
My back is well and truly knackered, but I'm managing to get two hours now on my 'race geometry' road bikes (bum up, head down type) despite spending five years since breaking my spine on a Full suspension MTB and a rigid.

Worth thinking about the current bike, maybe flip the stem to give greater height, or buy a shorter stem and flip that too, higher and shorter.

The other issue is you might not be used to it. My back has been sore after an hour on the road bikes, it's going to take time as the 'fitting' on these two hasn't changed in 30 years, so they fit, but my body isn't so flexible.
 

fossyant

Ride It Like You Stole It!
Location
South Manchester
interesting view but is that really the case? I have the idea that many folk with drops don't spend that much time on the drops, as they are wont to quickly say if anyone suggests that they find drops awkward.
I personally only use drops for descents, and even less at the minute as I'm getting back into the road cycling. Tops and hoods are most comfy.
 

DRM

Guru
Location
West Yorks
Which Gestalt have you got, is it the Gestalt X10/X11, you may have been better off with the Gestalt 2 which is more like a road bike than a drop bar MTB, my Gestalt 2 is a really comfy ride on the hoods and you’re not to far stretched out, the 1x Gestalt X10 range seem to be a bum up, head down type of bike, despite being a more off road oriented bike
 

Pale Rider

Legendary Member
Can anyone suggest something that’s close to road gearing but has a more upright position?
An MTB with a mountain triple - there are still a few around - would have a 48 or 50 tooth front ring.

With a standard cassette on the back that would give you a top gear of 50/11, which is close to road gearing, although whether you could manage typical roadie cadence on it is another matter.

No problem at the other end of the range which would have lower gears than most road bikes.
 

battered

Guru
I'd get a hybrid, comfy geometry, flat bars, MTB gearing. My most used bike, a 25 year old MTB turned commuter/tourer, has standard MTB gearing, rigid forks and 26 x 1.5 slicks. It rides like a road bike. Gearing is 3 x 8, rings 22-34-44 (?) x 11-30 or 32, I forget. It's been over Ventoux with luggage, I had enough gears up and down. You will spin out above ~35mph, is this a problem? If it is then fit a bigger top ring. My tip is to fit some currently grossly unfashionable bar ends, this allows you to shuffle about on your equally unfashionable flat bars.
 
Top Bottom